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By Kellene Bishop

(Sorry folks. It had to be addressed eventually.)

This will either be the worst article you’ve read from me, or, if you’re female, it may be one of the best.

menses-preparation-TampaxLadies, exactly what do you intend to do during a prolonged emergency survival situation when you’re not able to obtain feminine products which you’ve grown accustomed to? I admit, I’m storing loads of these kinds of products, but frankly, I’m intending to use feminine pads as bandages, if necessary.

Keeping in mind that sanitation is critical to the health of everyone around you, and the fact that a hot running water shower won’t come easily, I think it’s important that women take alternative options into consideration in dealing with their menses.

Realize that the comfort and care of a female during this period of time may not be isolated solely to experienced women. If you are the mother of a young daughter who happens to enter this phase of her life during a survival situation, it can be pretty traumatic if she has to do so the way the pioneers handled it. (ie: stuffing rags, ergo the term we hear sometimes today, “on the rag.”)

So what are your options? Well, you can store a lot of feminine pads and tampons and take up a lot of valuable space in your storage. Or you can plan on doing it the pioneer way by ripping strips of rags to use in lieu of a tampon and constantly change them, thus using lots of fuel and water to sanitize them. Or you can use a menstrual cup.

DivaCup photo c/o gladrags.com

DivaCup photo c/o gladrags.com

A menstrual cup resembles a diaphragm. It is reusable and easy to sanitize with some potable water and a mild soap. They are about 2 inches long and about 3 inches in diameter. The good ones are made of a soft plastic silicon for comfort. (Beware of those made with latex!) They are inserted much like a tampon would be and they collect the menses flow. They do not absorb the flow. Unlike tampons, there have been no reports of Toxic Shock Syndrome associated with their use. A menstrual cup can even be left in place for 12 hours on light flow days without any adverse consequences.

You should plan on having one menstrual cup per year per person—contrary to what the advertisements say about using one for 10 years. I definitely would NOT plan on relying on that statement. A menstrual cup should not be used for any other purpose and it should not be shared with any other person after use.

The cost of a quality menstrual cup is about $35-$40. Frankly, considering the cost of feminine pads and tampons, it’s no wonder menstrual cups are used regularly in many European countries. I recommend the DivaCuptm.  It has extensive benefits vs. more generic and less researched brands and it does not contain any latex or nitrosamine. You can obtain them easily at drugstore.com where there have been times when I’ve seen great discounts there for any item you purchase.

Ok. Well, now that I’ve gotten that topic out of the way, tune in for less “icky” topics. 🙂

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

By Kellene Bishop

Dharma Food Supplies

Food Storage photo c/o westword.com

If you could only store four foods for you and your family, what would they be? Come on, take your best guess. The good news is you could indeed survive with some knowledge and creativity on just four foods for you and your family for an entire year, and you wouldn’t necessarily get bored either. The reason I share these four foods with you is in response to so many pleas to simplify food storage. Although I feel more strongly about storing what you eat and eating what you store using the “meal method”, some folks just simply won’t tackle their food storage needs unless it’s broken down to ultra simple. Well, here’s ultra simple, broken down to just four foods.

Allow me to share with you what I call “The Vital Four.” I don’t call them that to be cute or cunning. These four foods are not only ideal and relatively simple to use, they are also still relatively affordable.

Hard White Wheat photo c/o pgward.org

Hard White Wheat photo c/o pgward.org

So, what would The Vital Four be? In order of priority:

  • Wheat
  • Powdered Milk
  • Honey
  • Salt

Now, before you get crazy, these foods would NOT be appropriate if you currently aren’t eating wheat. Remember that due to the significant lack of fiber in our diet today, if you were to go on an all wheat diet, you would be dead within 30 days due to the shock to your digestive system. So don’t plan on using these foods “cold turkey”, folks. You’ve got to get your body used to this kind of fiber ahead of time if you intend to survive on it. With four of the most simple foods, could this list be any more “ultra simple?”

So why this particular order?

Vital Four #1: Wheat. Wheat is at the top of the list due to its enormous amount of protein, multiple uses, fats, amino acids, carbohydrates, antioxidants, minerals and vitamins—not to mention its longevity in your storage. An unbroken wheat kernel has the ability to retain its fat without going rancid. For those of you who don’t know, wheat was discovered in the Egyptian pyramids dating back to 2500 BC. The story is told that 36 of the kernels were planted and grew and thrived into 1,500 bushels of wheat over six years. Even those who are gluten intolerant can still use wheat by sprouting it. Once you sprout it, it’s no longer a gluten compound. It’s a vegetable—particularly high in vitamin C and B which is great for blood sugar regulation and energy. (1 ounce of sprouted wheat contains an entire day’s supply of vitamin C.) In other words, sprouted wheat can compensate for the absence of fruits and vegetables in a diet. As you’ve heard me say, sprouting is ultra simple.

Milk is Good for Bones. photo c/o franklinpierce.edu

Milk is Good for Bones. photo c/o franklinpierce.edu

Vital Four #2: Milk.  An important part of the “promised land” duo, milk has a great nutritional content–particularly protein and vitamin A and D, multiple convenient uses, and also stores very well–especially with today’s technological advances. Milk is a quality food which is found to be important for the proper function of the muscles and the bones, but even more so in times of stress. Very few foods can claim to assist the body in these two critical areas in one fail swoop, and none of the others I’ve found which do assist the body in this manner taste very good in baked goods, cheeses, and sauces like milk does. I mean really. Whoever heard of spinach cheese?  There’s nothing difficult about using milk. Measure it. Water it. Mix it. That’s it. Super simple!

Vital Four #3: Honey. Honey is the ONLY food which stores indefinitely (except maybe Twinkies. But it remains to be seen whether we can really call the Twinkie “food”). It was also found in the Egyptian pyramids, and serves as a necessary sweetener in everything which may call for sugar. As you may have read in a previous article, it also has amazing medicinal virtues. One aspect you may not have considered is that the sweetness of honey is so fulfilling, it’s not likely to be over indulged in. The last thing you need in an emergency is to be addicted to a particular food. Unlike so many other sweeteners out there, honey is NOT addictive. In fact several university studies have shown that withdrawing from sugar is just as challenging to most humans as withdrawing from heroine. Honey also has small amounts of protein, iron, and vitamin C. Hmmm… sweet, nutritious, and an indefinite shelf-life. Sounds like a food storage dream.  

Vital Four #4: Salt. Many folks are surprised to hear “salt” on my list of The Vital Four. Frankly, I’m surprised as well. I’m not one to “salt my foods. I rarely use it in my cooking, preferring other sources for a salty taste instead. In actuality, our bodies are just as reliant on salt as we are on water. In fact, it keeps our fluids in balance. It is necessary to all of the cellular processes in our body. ALL of them. It’s particularly necessary for muscle contractions, such as your heartbeat, nerve impulses, and the digestion of proteins. Our bodies do not produce salt. We deplete it through normal function. And we deplete a lot of salt when we’re involved in heavy labor or intense stress. Thus we must conscientiously feed it to our bodies. In addition to all of this, it’s also a great preservative for meats and vegetables without the need of any fancy equipment. Better yet, working salt into your diet doesn’t take any trickery.

If you want to still keep things ultra simple but add a few more “luxury items” to the list, I would recommend vegetable/olive oil, peanut butter, legumes, yeast, molasses, and dried fruits.

Passport to Survival photo c/o amazon.com

Passport to Survival photo c/o amazon.com

In summary, I find it interesting that The Vital Four are referred to in the Bible as foods of prominence: wheat—“the staff of life,” “land flowing with milk and honey” (mentioned 70 times in the Bible), and salt—“the salt of the earth” and “savor.” If you want a bundle of easy and creative recipes to use with your ultra simple food stores, I highly recommend Esther Dickey’s book, “Passport to Survival.” It was published in the late 60’s so you will most likely acquire a used copy on Amazon. But I find my copy to be just as useful—if not more so—today than perhaps it was intended to be several decades ago.

So I’ve made food storage as simple as is absolutely possible. Got any more excuses for delaying your food storage?  🙂

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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By Kellene Bishop

CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED.

Ok, here it goes. I’m going to challenge you…nah—perhaps the better word is “DARE” you. In fact, I’m going to DOUBLE DOG DARE YA to take this Preparedness Pro Food Challenge.

food-challengeWant to find out if you are really ready for an emergency? Here’s a genuine challenge for you. Your ability to implement it will say a LOT about your ability to truly survive a real emergency. The Preparedness Pro Food Challenge officially begins August 1st and goes throughout the month of August. During the month I challenge you to go an entire two weeks without going to the grocery store for any food or household supplies. 14 days. No grocery purchases, no household cleaners, no produce. Can you and your family survive? No big deal, perhaps? Yeah. Say that after you’ve done it. Then I will bow to you and call you “The Preparedness Queen/King.”

Now take this seriously. No cheating. Don’t go to a restaurant or get one of those free hot dogs at the furniture store promotion either. If you go to the farmer’s market, you’re cheating. Rely on all of your food and household needs strictly based on what you have available to you right now. Do it the entire 14 days. Don’t cut corners. Don’t rationalize. And for goodness sake, don’t starve your family for 14 days. 🙂

Obviously, a disaster is no respecter of bank account balances, professional positions, or “time of the month.” It’s a true equalizer of all mankind. So, at the end of 14 days, what kind of man or woman will you be? I bet you have no idea just how often you “pick up a little something” at the store.

This challenge is pretty straight forward. It doesn’t need to be made harder than it is. The challenge does not require you to go without electricity or any of your other luxuries in life. Just go two whole weeks without going out and buying anything you need for nutrition or household care.

Groceries photo c/o Shannon Steele

Groceries photo c/o Shannon Steele

The key to this Preparedness Pro Food Challenge is to do it without any notice or preplanning. That means that you don’t go out today and buy all of the groceries that you think you might need to last you two weeks. (Although, if I at least get you to do that much, maybe it’s a good thing. 🙂 ) Interestingly enough, I bet that even if you were to go shopping, you would still find yourself struggling. During this challenge I anticipate that you will struggle with what to cook. You will struggle with eating what you have instead of eating what you’re in the mood for. Bottom line, you will be challenged without all of the modern-day pampering we have when it comes to food.

So, can you take this challenge to heart? Can your family endure it without threatening a mutiny? Remember, I’m not challenging you to go without your other comforts of life. You can still watch television. You can still use your running water. You can still use your microwave and all of your other favored kitchen gadgets. Just abstain from the purchase of any kind of grocery or household items for two whole weeks. Prepare your meals any way you want. Ramen noodles? Frozen pizza? Using the microwave? Fine. Then again I would recommend you actually cook real food during this period as well, but I won’t hold you to that. Just don’t bring any additional supplies into your home to sustain you during this two week Preparedness Pro Food Challenge. Pick any 14 day period you want. Get your whole family on board. In fact, invite your friends and extended family to do the challenge with you as well. Come on, it will be a GREAT experiment!

As you accept and experience this challenge, write your comments on our blog. It will help all of our readers see some of the most basic areas of preparedness which they haven’t considered previously. I guarantee there will be some eye opening experiences.

Giveaway with GREAT Prizes! Photo c/o rei.com

Giveaway with GREAT Prizes! Photo c/o rei.com

At the end of August, we’re going to have a drawing for GREAT emergency preparedness giveaway items. We’re going to give away all kinds of preparedness items such as an EZ Sprouter, non-electric hand mixer, solar head lamp, and more. There’s a cluster of some of my favorite emergency preparedness items and I’m excited to give them to some lucky participants! The more times you write your comments on our blog on this topic, the more times your name will be entered in the drawing. We’ll hold the drawing on September 1st and notify all 12 winners! You may win a solar light/radio, private consultation time with me, or you may win a food storage cookbook. But more importantly, you’ll gain invaluable insight into whether or not you’re prepared in this one simple area. Obviously, if you aren’t able to last 2 weeks comfortably, you’re going to have a lot of trouble lasting a year. But what I really hope is that many of you will gain a sense of confidence and peace seeing that you can truly make it if need be. You can be creative with your cooking. You can be independent of our traditional commerce system. And you can successfully troubleshoot as the two weeks progress.

The question is, why wouldn’t you accept the challenge? There will always be excuses. And I can assure you that an emergency never waits until you are completely ready. Life will still have to go on regardless. But I assure you that none of your excuses will hold much water when you consider the invaluable experience you will gain from this. This is only a two week challenge. You get to keep everything else normal in your life. But through this Preparedness Pro Food Challenge, you’ll begin to see where the gaps may be. You’ll realize perhaps just how reliant you or your family members may be on the conveniences of our society. Your kids will learn what they are made of. You’ll all learn to think and strategize just a bit differently. If I have a vote, I say heck yeah! Take this Preparedness Pro Food Challenge! You’ll be SO glad you did!

The winners have been drawn! Click here to see if you were one of the 12 winners!

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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What to store in your food storage?
By Kellene Bishop

There are 3 aspects that you need to concern yourself with when it comes to your food storage.  Nutrition, preparation, and rotation.

Photo c/o crusa-soccer.com/

Create balanced meals. Photo c/o crusa-soccer.com/

The nutrition aspect has to do with WHAT you store.  Be sure it’s not food that will simply enable you to survive, but THRIVE.  Feeding your body quality nutrition in a time of stress is critical.  It’s one thing to try and live off of fast food and such when you lead a mostly sedentary lifestyle.  You may not think of food much now in your every day life.  But having nourishment will be one of your most overriding primary instincts to kick in during a time of survival.  (Yet another reason why to try and get the picky eaters in your family to expand their food repertoire.)  I’ve read messages from some folks that they have a years supply in dry cereal, or Kraft Mac & Cheese, etc.  While these “foods” may give some comfort immediately, they will not provide the nutrition you need and appetite fatigue will surely set in. 

What should be a part of your food storage?  As you plan your meals, go back to creating balanced meals.  You know, fruits, vegetables, protein, and grains.  Each meal you plan for your long term food storage should provide at least one serving in each of these categories. Keep in mind that you will use and require more carbohydrates in a crisis scenario than you most likely do now. 

Remember, the key is to not get overwhelmed with the food storage.  If I were to tell you that you needed to store 300 pounds of grains (wheat, pasta, flour, etc.) per person over the age of 7, no doubt that would stress you out and overwhelm you.  (Even though that figure is correct.)  This is exactly why I encourage folks to create their food storage based on meals and dishes rather than pounds.  THEN when you feel like you’ve accomplished your goal in that regard, do a little bit of calculating using this food storage calculator link and see if there may be some items to add in various categories such as fats and oils, or legumes, or sugars.

If you store based on “meals” then you don’t have to really concern yourself with “oh yeah, I need 3 pounds of cinnamon for the year” or other seasonings and sauces.  You will essentially have a year’s supply of menus figured out and thus you’ll have all of the seasonings you need for those dishes.  Add the extras after the fact.  Planning this way will also save you LOTS and LOTS of money too.  You’ll be less likely purchasing something just because it looks like a good deal, and only purchase what you know you and your family will use in specific meals. 

Propane Stove

Propane Stove

The next aspect of your food storage is preparation.  Do you have the tools and resources you need to prepare the food?  Do you have the recipes stored with the dishes? While it’s great that you may have recipes memorized, what if you’re ill or otherwise unavailable and aren’t the one preparing the food?  Do you have a hand beater stored since you won’t be able to use an electric one?  Do you know how to use your solar oven, Dutch oven, charcoal, propane stove or wood burning stove?  How are you going to clean up from cooking?  How are you going to ensure sanitized cooking conditions?

The last consideration of what to store in your food storage, is rotation.  If you find a great deal on 30 gallons of cooking oil, great, get it—but ONLY if you already use such an oil and can do so in an appropriate period of time.  Very little of your food storage should be purchased or stored with a “store it and forget it” mentality.  You need to look at just about everything you’ve got from a rotation standpoint.  This is a monumental task if you’re not already using what you store. 

Personally, I think making an excel spreadsheet of one’s food storage or taking time to label each container of food prior to putting it away, is a major pain in the fanny and certainly yet another deterrent to being prepared.  I store my food left to right, front to back, and I use it right to left and back to front.  I don’t put any labels on the food (other than when I bottle or freeze it) and I don’t have a special software accounting system.  As I bring things up from my food storage, I make a note on the grocery list to replace them.  The “system” is as easy as that.  As a result, I keep a pulse on what I have and its condition.  Very little of what I have purchased over the years gets wasted this way. 

As you can see in this series, the key is to make your food storage as underwhelming and second nature as your grocery shopping and meal preparations are today.  Your food storage efforts just need a little tweak in your mental preparedness and you’ll find that you have the time and energy to focus on the other aspects of preparedness that may more appropriately stretch your skills and time.

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

By Kellene Bishop

Photo c/o sqpn.com

Photo c/o sqpn.com

Are you ready to survive a 90-day quarantine?  Is such a scenario even realistic? Well, let’s explore that. 

Suppose the flu virus did get out of hand.  In all actuality, it’s quite likely.  The most current strain is eerily similar to the Spanish flu virus of 1918 which went pandemic in less than 3 months.  It took the lives of over fifty-percent of those who contracted it.  It took only 8 months for it to kill 100 million people.  The only thing saving us right now is that the swine flu and the bird flu have not completely morphed to the point that it transfers easily.  Once that does occur, you can indeed expect to see a quarantine situation.  It means that each and every home affected by a pandemic must be ready to survive a 90-day quarantine.

Photo c/o AP

Photo c/o AP

Why a 90-day quarantine?  Because our government and the World Health Organization will definitely demand that the virus be halted.  This can only be done through a quarantine period of time that is sufficient to ensure that the virus ceases to be transmitted.  Ten to twelve weeks is that appropriate period of time to ensure that someone is past the incubation period and the virus is no longer spreading.  (But remember, it took 8 months for the Chinese to eliminate SARS from their country.)

While our nation has not experienced such a quarantine in over a century, I assure you that when a quarantine occurs, it will cause panic and unintentional deaths.  Many of these deaths will NOT occur as a result of the pandemic, rather as a result of a lack of preparation.  Being ready to survive a 90-day quarantine is about much more than just food and water.  To be sufficiently ready you will require several components you may not have previously considered.  

So what does this mean to you in terms of physical and emotional survival?  Well, for starters it means that the person’s household you planned on joining to live off of their preparedness supplies will NOT be an option.  You will be forbidden to travel under any circumstances.  While many have strategized that they will gather in groups to survive a crisis, such a plan under these circumstances could mean death to those who leave the sanctity of their homes.  However, travel restrictions may require you to stay right where you are which may be in a gathering.  This means that if you are visiting at Aunt Beatrice’s or on a vacation when the pandemic hits, you will have no choice but to stay put and ride it out for 90 days.  Ask yourself.  Do you have at least a multiple day survival kit on hand with food, water, a change of clothes, and simple medical supplies such as a dust mask for such an occasion?  Remember.  You must think in terms of surviving a full 90-day quarantine period.  

This also means that you will NOT be permitted to go to the grocery store or gas station for a last minute stock up.  A mandatory quarantine of this nature will require that the roads are clear of anything other than non-essential travel.  This also means that if you have the luxury of the quarantine order going into effect while you are home, you—and all those with you at the time—must be able to live off of the food, water, medical, and financial supplies that you have for three whole months.  It means you will NOT be able to visit your grandmother in the nursing home.  Depending on where you are, this could also mean that you will NOT be able to get to the hospital to give birth to your child—and frankly, you will not want to go to the hospital in order to avoid getting deathly ill.  Typically, only life and death cases will be admitted during a quarantine.  This means that many of the businesses you rely on will be shut down as the owners and employees will also be quarantined to their homes.  As such, this also results in many desperate individuals, unable to obtain their oxycontin or other drugs of choice, who may roam the streets.  Not only will you need to make sure you can survive in your home with sufficient food and water, you will need to make sure you can defend safely as well 

food-storageAnother consideration to survive a 90-day quarantine is whether you will be able to endure the flu itself should someone in your home contract it.  The food you have in your storage could literally mean life or death to all who are dwelling with you—not just from the standpoint of providing meals, but being able to provide nutrition for the ill.  Stocking up on effective anti-oxidants, intensely nutritional products, air masks, sanitizing solutions, WATER, FLUIDS, nutritional foods, and other needs are also vital for you to be prepared. 

Food, water and medical supplies are obvious needs in such a situation.  Please understand that regardless of whether or not you’re permitted to go out and work, your obligation to pay your bills, your mortgage, and credit cards will NOT go away.  In fact, in the midst of such an event, it’s likely that companies which find themselves financially vulnerable right now may act with less compassion and patience than they may have in the past.  

I’m not attempting to alarm or panic anyone.  But I assure you I will be quite distressed to think of all of the folks I know presently who are indeed NOT ready for a quarantine.  To me this is not a matter of IF it will occur.  It’s a matter of WHEN such an instance manifests itself.

Here’s a little bit of comfort for you.  Chances are, in a quarantine we will still have electricity and sewage services.  Thank goodness.  So that means that while we may have to endure a 90-day quarantine with people we don’t get along with 24/7, at least we can have some comfort.  Refrigeration should still be viable, as should microwave uses, and even video games.  🙂  Additionally, sufficient food for one person can be obtained for only a dollar a day.  You do not need to spend a fortune to get ready for such an instance. 

So, don’t panic.  Just get educated and get prepared.  You can indeed be ready to survive a 90-day quarantine.  And in fact, that’s just the beginning. 

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

By Kellene Bishop

Many are reluctant to take food storage preparations seriously due to a fear that they will have to live merely on beans and rice.  While I do enjoy a good meal of beans and rice, I’ll admit the thought of it makes me somewhat depressed.  As a professional preparedness consultant, I can assure you that your meals need not be any less enjoyable during an emergency that they are now.  You can truly anticipate meals that are fit for a king, even when you’re living off of your storable commodities.  Perhaps the only downside to these meals is that you’ll have to do the cooking.  A little bit of preparation now will go a long ways in preserving your own physical energy and warding off the blues in the event of a crisis.  Bring on the succulent feast!  

My primary suggestion for the preparation in the future is to begin to embrace freeze dried and canned foods in your everyday cooking now so that you can enjoy dishes fit for a king.  (Photo care of http://www.logoi.com/)

Photo c/o bluechipgroup.net

Photo c/o bluechipgroup.net

Freeze dried products have come a LONG ways.  I am very partial to the Blue Chip products as they are SO tasty, and even come with an 18 month guarantee that’s effective AFTER you open the #10 cans.  Now when I use freeze dried veggies and such, I don’t throw away or waste produce, I only use as much as I need, I don’t have to sacrifice taste or nutrition and I also save a great deal of time.  For example, I have several food storage recipes which call for a part of a can of tomato paste.  By using the freeze dried version, I only use exactly what I need and the rest will be there for me over the next 18 months.  When I want a little bell pepper and spinach for an omelet (how’s that for dishes fit for a king?), I don’t have to take the time to dice the produce.  I just add in what I want and the put the rest away for later.  Easy, right?  I’ve tried over 35 of the Blue Chip products (also recognized under the name “Morning Moos”) and have never been dissatisfied.  In fact, I have enjoyed some of the products so much, that they’ve definitely made their way into my everyday cooking!  

So enjoy these recipes fit for a king today and know that they will taste just as yummy in the future!

Turkey Tetrazzini

(Serves 4)

2 10 oz. cans of turkey or chicken

14 oz. of spaghetti noodles, broken into thirds, cooked and drained

1 6 oz. can of sliced mushrooms, or the equivalent of freeze dried mushrooms

1 T of minced onion

1 T of minced garlic

1 t. of fresh parsley (fresh is best so consider keeping an herb garden)

1 16 oz. can of chicken broth

1 12 oz. can evaporated milk

½ cup flour

1 t. salt

½ t. pepper

½ C of butter (or dried equivalent)

½ C grated parmesan cheese

Make a white sauce by mixing the butter, flour, chicken broth and 1 C of evaporated milk in a pot on medium heat, stirring constantly until creamy.

Stir in the mushrooms (if dried, allow them to rehydrate before adding in any other ingredients) and then the turkey/chicken.  Add onion and garlic and parsley.

Add in the cooked pasta.

Stir the sauce and pasta together well and place in a baking dish.

Top with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.  This can be baked in a Dutch oven easily or a solar oven.  It can also be baked in a covered grill at a low heat.  Be sure that the casserole dish can withstand direct fire contact. 

Photo c/o lapetitechinoise.com

Photo c/o lapetitechinoise.com

Shepherds Pie

 (Serves 4)

1 40 oz. can beef stew

1 12 oz. can vegetables (peas, corn, or green beans)

1 C of “potato pearls”, “potato gems” (made by Blue Chip), or “potato buds”

½ C grated cheese (optional.  You can easily keep cheese in your food storage by waxing your own cheese)

1 C very hot water

Combine stew and vegetables and pour into a 9×9 baking dish. 

Combine potato pearls with water. Stir briefly. Cover and let stand for 5- 10 minutes.

Spread potatoes over the stew mixture, top with grated cheese if desired.

Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until hot and bubbly.

This can also be cooked in a Dutch Oven or a solar oven very easily. You can also put the mixture into individual ramekins and cook them in the solar oven as well.

Beef Stroganoff

(Serves 4)

1 10 oz. can of beef chunks of cooked ground beef

1 4 oz. can of sliced mushrooms (or equivalent of dried mushrooms)

1 10 oz. can of cream of mushroom soup

2 T of dehydrated onion

8 oz. of egg noodles, prepared according to directions

OR

1 C of rice prepared according to directions

1 C of yogurt or sour cream (this can easily be prepared from your powdered milk)

In a large skillet or Dutch oven, combine all ingredients except for the yogurt or sour cream and noodles/rice.  Heat through.  Stir in the yogurt or sour cream and heat through.  Serve mixture over noodles/rice.

Notes: You can also add some fresh parsley to this dish or a can of peas, drained.

Swiss Steak

(Serves 4)

1 1.25 oz. package of dry, brown gravy mix

1 15 oz. can diced or pureed tomatoes (depending on your texture preference)

1 12 oz. can roast beef chunks

1 C potato pearls, gems, or buds

2 T dehydrated carrots

1 T diced dehydrated green pepper

2 T minced dehydrated onion

1 ¾ C water for gravy

1 C very hot water

2 C of boiling water to mix with potatoes

First hydrate the carrots, green peppers and onions by placing them in a bowl and covering them with the very hot water. Set them aside for about 10 to 30 minutes, adding more water if necessary.

In a large skillet or Dutch oven, mix together the water and gravy with a whisk.  Stir until lumps have been dissipated.

Stir in the hydrated carrots, peppers, onions, and the tomatoes. Bring to a boil while stirring. Reduce heat to medium and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add beef and continue to simmer until heated through.

In a separate container mix together the potatoes and 2 cups of boiling water. (Water previously used for cooking pasta, rice or vegetables is ideal)

Enjoy your new food storage dishes, fit for a king! 

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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By Kellene Bishop

Photo: James Davies

Photo: James Davies

With the market being the way it is, many are asking what is the safest investment nowadays.  I’ll tell you.  FOOD.  FOOD is the BEST investment today. 

Why?  Because if used properly, it’s life saving.  A meal today will always be worth a meal tomorrow.  Food is the best investment because Wall Street can never alter its impact on our appetites.  The rate of foreclosures can never diminish its taste.  The great thing about food is that competition reigns supreme among the grocery stores in most cities throughout America.  As a result, all kinds of food—from fresh to processed, from sensible to indulgent—can be obtained at an extreme discount.  Try buying stocks and bonds at a ninety percent discount or getting paid to buy them.  That’s exactly what happens when I obtain FOOD, thus truly making food the very best investment. 

Try chewing on a pair of $1,000 shoes when all of your power goes out for a month due to a freak storm.  Try living off of your gold bullion for nutrition and survival.  In such circumstances all of the Coca-Cola decorations, scrapbooking supplies, stacking dolls, and baseball card collections won’t be worth a penny.  As such they will all be downgraded in their value to a nuisance and perhaps even a regret.

In addition to that, allow me to indulge in being a bit prophetic.  Mark my words.  There are too many indicators coming from all different directions that the value of food is better than anything else you know right now.  I assure you, a bucket of wheat will surpass the value of a bucket of gold!  You don’t need to look very far (geographically or in time) to see that this is all indeed possible.  Food is truly your best investment.  While many may come up with never-ending excuses to abandon this wisdom—in exchange for an aesthetically pleasing environment, or the inconvenience of rotating the food, or having to gain more knowledge so that can be smart in the use of their supplies—these boil down to very short-sighted excuses.  Think about it.  How many of us have endured difficult education experiences and high tuition rates just so that we could provide a good life for ourselves and our families?  And yet we refuse to acknowledge the need to continue to educate ourselves with this relatively simple practice of storing foods.  I know many parents who firmly believe they would die to save their children’s lives.  Yes, but will you LIVE in such a way now so that you can save them?

Food is your BEST investment.  Water is also virtually free, so there’s no excuse not to obtain that in a hearty supply.  And just in case you were wondering, ammo is next on the list.

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!