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food-challenge

This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

Don’t forget, folks, that you still have one more week to participate in the Preparedness Pro Food Challenge! The Preparedness Pro Food Challenge goes through the entire month of August and constitutes going an entire two weeks without going to the grocery store for any food or household supplies.

Even if you haven’t started yet, or this is the first you’ve heard of the Preparedness Pro Food Challenge, I would challenge you to jump in with both feet and see how you do without any preplanning or hitting the grocery store to “stock up” on the way home.  As you accept and experience this challenge, visit the original Preparedness Pro Food Challenge blog and document your experiences. Each comment will count as an entry to win AMAZING emergency preparedness prizes! There is no limit to the amount of comments you can leave. We have 12 gifts that will go to randomly drawn winners on September 1st.

ALSO, here are 3 easy ways to enter the contest and increase your chances of winning great prizes! Become a fan of Preparedness Pro on FacebookFollow @preparednesspro on Twitter or subscribe to Preparedness Pro — these will each count as an extra entry! Does it get any easier than that?!

Leave your comments on the original Preparendess Pro Food Challenge blog HERE!

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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By Kellene Bishop

 

Is the Swine flu just something on the news, or should you actually be concerned about it from a preparation standpoint? The answer is yes, you should indeed be concerned about the Swine Flu—here are three important reasons why.

 

 

swine-flu-cellularFirst of all, understand the virus itself and you will understand why informed concern is appropriate in this case. It is a mutation which has components of the Avian flu, the regular flu, and Swine flu. Avian flu is dangerous only in that it is transported from birds to people. It cannot be transferred from people to people. However, this strain of the Swine Flu can. So, if it continues to mutate, you can have a virus strain that not only transfers from person to person, but also from birds to people. As you know, birds have very little borders. They are able to spread their disease via the dust and any other airborne particles easily. Because this virus has already demonstrated a successful mutation of 3 different strains, it shows that it will clearly continue to do so. A mutated virus makes creating antigens in your body very difficult. And if YOU can’t even create the antigens, then a scientist cannot do so either. Additionally, this particular strain of flu is very different. Instead of simply attaching to cells in our body, it is actually able to penetrate the cell wall, thus making exposure to antigens much more challenging. This particular strain of influenza, because it is compromised of H1N1 (Swine) and H5N1 (Avian) makes it an extremely penetrable and deadly virus which is rapidly adaptable and virulent. These two strains combined produce a killing potential at a cellular level.

 

 

cdcAnother reason to be concerned is that the confirmed cases of Swine flu that we have been told by the media to date have been done so through the very limited availability of test kits from the CDC (Center for Disease Control). Understand that only the CDC can “confirm” a case of this type of virus. And the CDC only this week began sending out test kits to parts of the U.S. and to other parts of the world as well. We already have cases which have spread to New Zealand, Scotland, Brazil, Australia, and Canada. What all of this means is that we haven’t even begun to see the real numbers of people affected this flu epidemic. Keep in mind that viruses in general are not living organisms, rather they are protein structures whose only goal is to replicate themselves.

 

 

The third reason why we should indeed be concerned is because even if this isn’t “the big one” it is certainly an incident which should wake us from our slumber of apathy. There is much to be learned from this outbreak that can literally save our lives. Looking at this outbreak and analyzing how we can better be prepared in the event that a pandemic affects our country and even the world, is the best way to prepare. However, having said that, I would prefer that you not underestimate the efficacy of this particular outbreak. To do so would be sugarcoating a situation with strychnine. Let’s not forget the facts thus far here. Schools are being shut down. DHS is taking action to be prepared for a possible pandemic. (Compare this to the fact that FEMA can’t even take action until after a serious crisis has occurred—this should tell you something.) The World Health Organization is NOT closing the borders because they state that such an act would be futile since the virus is already established widespread. (Remember what I said about not even having the real numbers yet?) One case of the Swine flu on a plane headed to JFK, La Guardia, Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, the San Francisco international airport and you can easily have a pandemic. (Come on. Think about it. You know how incredibly dirty the air on the airplanes are. Do you actually think that the air filtration systems on board will filter out this virus from traveling from one host to another?) Keep in mind that individuals who are carrying the virus may simply be a host. They may carry it to others without necessarily manifesting symptoms of it themselves. So you may assume that you are interacting with a perfectly healthy person, but still contract the virus strain.

 

 

I’m not being a fear monger here. As someone who tends to get emotionally involved in the well-being of others, I’m trying to get you to be fully aware of how fast this or other strains like it can spread. It will be incredibly difficult for me to see so many that I know and love exposed to such an illness such as the swine flu. So, given that I do believe you have need to be cautious in this situation and most definitely to learn from it, allow me to share with you how your behavior must change in the event of a full-spread outbreak. Review the following steps so that you can truly be prepared for such an event:

 

 

1) Always use a breathing mask outside of your home.

 

2) Wash your hands constantly and do not remove or put on your breathing mask without having just washed your hands

 

3) Keep your hands away from your eyes and mouth under all circumstances. (Use a fork even to eat your French fries with.)

 

4) Do not eat any food which you have not personally prepared

 

5) colloidal-mineralsRegularly ingest immune system building vitamins and herbs so that you can create a true, non-chemical immunity. Don’t wait until symptoms appear. While viruses tend to mutate and get stronger under chemical attacks, they respond completely differently to non-chemical, strong environments. This is the very kind of culture you can create in your body if you start partaking now of quality herbs, vitamins, and minerals. I STRONGLY suggest that you ingest sublingual (taken under the tongue) or colloidal versions of your nutrition supplements as such methods are actually able to permeate the cells. Taking pills does not have this effect on your body and thus is useless to attacking a strain such as this that burrows into your cell.

I highly recommend you use a colloidal version of minerals. Bacteria simply cannot grow in a mineral environment. (By the way, colloidal silver is another good remedy to have on hand for fighting a myriad of illnesses as well—see my other suggestions in yesterday’s article.)

 

6) Be sure you wash ALL of your vegetables (even the ones with skins) and meats very well prior to storing or cooking them. Also be sure to wipe off your cans of food prior to opening them. When you do follow these steps also be sure that you keep your hands washed afterwards as well. Here’s a natural wash for your meats and vegetables that you can make yourself.

· 1/4 cup Vinegar

· 2 Tablespoons salt

Fill a clean sink with cold water, (a plastic dish pan also works wonders) add vinegar and salt and let sit 15 minutes, rinse. (The vinegar cleans the fruits and vegetables, while the salt draws out any maggots and such, dirt and other undesirable components. This wash does not adversely affect the flavor at all and vinegar helps take care of the sprays and wax they tend to use.

 

7) shaklee-basic-g Use a germicide (not a sanitizer) on high-traffic areas in your home such as door and cabinet knobs, telephones, and table edges. I highly recommend the one that Shaklee makes. It’s 100% biodegradable, concentrated, affordable, and incredibly EFFECTIVE.

 

8.) Use Latex gloves when handling items from outside of your home or when assisting other individuals (whether they manifest symptoms or not) outside of your home.

 

9) Eliminate contact with other people outside of your home as much as is truly possible.

 

10)Don’t leave your home unless you absolutely have to. In such an instance, be sure that you are adorned with a breathing mask and have latex gloves. (If this particular strain were able to mutate into a flu strain that cannot only be transferred from person to person, but also from birds to person, then it’s critical that you leave your home only at night, not during the day as birds typically only fly during the day light hours.)

 

 

I hope this piece gives you further insight into your own preparedness efforts. And I truly wish you well in your goals of becoming more prepared.

If you would like Kellene Bishop to present an Emergency Preparedness message for your community or church group, please contact us at 801-788-4133.  Ms. Bishop is an experienced speaker and demonstrator on Emergency Preparedness topics and has created a great “Preparedness Party” platform which makes the learning of such a topic more enjoyable for all.

Click here for more from Preparedness Pro on the Swine flu.

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

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By Kellene Bishop

 

CORRECTION Mexico Flu

Photo by AP Photo / Miguel Tovar
 
Hopefully the news as of late regarding the spread of Swine flu has you concerned to some degree of your own exposure. Or perhaps the news has at least made you aware that your emergency preparedness supplies aren’t presently sufficient for such a crisis. If you’re becoming aware of such a situation, that’s actually the best thing that can result from the news of this epidemic. Because the good news is that you can be prepared for this and other like ailments by taking some proactive steps now.  Being prepared independently to handle such a crisis as a Swine flu epidemic is critical. Believing that life will always be “normal enough” for you to plan on having access to the “anti-virus” or vaccination shortly after the time of exposure is truly a gamble of Russian roulette proportions. 

First let’s look at some supplies that you will want to have on hand for external physical benefits.

 1. Breathing mask: A great deal of flu diseases are spread airborne. As such, being sure to protect your nose and your mouth from inhaling the disease or even from spreading it should you have been exposed to it is critical. Breathing masks are much like what you see on the doctors or nurses faces during a surgery. They do not have to be a heavy plastic. (In fact, if you do end up having to wear them for an extended period of time, you’ll wish that they aren’t heavy.) Instead, you can purchase lightweight version at your bulk wholesale stores. You will need to anticipate needed one per person in your home for each day that you may have to ride out an epidemic.

 

hand-sanitizer2. Hand Sanitizer: While washing your hands with hot soap and water frequently is preferable, it’s not realistic should you have to endure a bio-crisis such as this. So be sure that you have a quality hand sanitizer on hand. Again, you want to be sure that you do not underestimate the quantity of this item to have readily accessible. Not only will it prove useful for spreading a disease, but it’s ideal for everyday use as you ride out any other type of emergency which requires you to live off of your supplies.

 3. Homeopathic Remedies: It’s important that you familiarize yourself with herbal or other types of remedies that can assist individuals who are exposed to something like the Swine flu. The more universal the remedy is, the better so that you don’t have to become a “pharmacy” of remedies. Storage space is valuable, right? I’ve researched a great deal of remedies and my first advice to you is to partake of something regularly now which truly strengthens your immune system. Use a quality nutrition supplement now in order to ensure your health later when such a disaster may affect you. I strongly recommend products such as Reliv or Essiac tea to be made a part of your daily regime now as if you wait until you’re exposed to an airborne illness such as the Swine flu to imbibe, your symptoms will be drawn out, and your body will also have to struggle with the introduction to healthy materials in addition to fighting the flu. To clarify, when you ingest a product which is effective in fighting such a virus, and strengthening your immune system, there will inevitably be some “cleansing” of your body. Cleansing toxins from your body can actually stir things up and make you a bit ill initially. So it’s important that you focus on your health now, so that if you have to step up your natural remedies, the cure doesn’t harm you, so to speak.oil-of-oregano2

 

4. In addition to these remedies to begin ingesting now, (you can also use them for crisis remedies as well) here is a list of other alternative remedies you may want to have on hand: 

Zinc Lozenges
Echinacea
Goldenseal
Oil of Oregano (a dose of two drops tastes nasty, but it will kill most any virus.)
Oscillococcinum
Gelsemium
Bryonia
Rhus Tox

5. Knowledge: Yes, it’s true. You don’t want to bet your life on the utilizations of methods that you aren’t familiar with. So obtaining the knowledge you need to properly use such alternative methods is critical. The good news is that finding the right homeopathic medicine for the flu is actually relatively straightforward because the symptoms are easy to identify and universally evident in most flu strains. (Fever, body aches, sore throat, cough, runny nose, vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy.) Additionally, you can take comfort in the fact that homeopaths have treated viral illnesses, including the flu as early as the 1918 flu pandemic. A report from the American Institute of Homeopathy in 1921 documented the dramatic success of homeopathy in the worst flu pandemic in history. The death rate of 24,000 flu cases under conventional medical care in that study was 28.2 percent, while the death rate of 26,000 cases treated with homeopathy was a nearly miraculous 1.05 percent. Similarly, many homeopathic physicians each reported treating thousands of patients with very few deaths. So get armed with the necessary knowledge, and you will truly be prepared.

Click here for more from Preparedness Pro on the Swine flu.

Preparedness Pro Note: If you would like Kellene Bishop to present an Emergency Preparedness message for your community or church group, please contact us at 801-788-4133.  Ms. Bishop is an experienced speaker and demonstrator on Emergency Preparedness topics and also has created a great “Preparedness Party” platform which makes the learning of such a topic more enjoyable for all.

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

 

By Kellene Bishop

 

To me Easter Sunday requires a great family meal, but for me it has to include some lamb.  However, after fighting a cold for nearly two weeks and knowing that I had a full day of church ahead of me, I just couldn’t see my way to cooking it the “normal way.”  So I pulled out my trusty pressure cooker and commenced my magic.  

 

leg-of-lamb-rice

 

First rinse off the leg of lamb with cool water.  (It usually comes with a netting from the store.)  

 

lamb-1

 

With a small paring knife cut deep but small in width “X” shapes throughout the side where the majority of the fat is.  Stuff garlic deep into these X pockets.  Then rub with a small amount of salt and black pepper. 

 

lamb-3

 

On medium-high heat, sear the lamb in your pressure cooker on all sides.  (Keep the netting on until you’re finished with this process.)  Once you’ve sufficiently seared the lamb, remove it from the hot pan, return it to the heat, and slowly pour in ½ cup of cooking wine.  (I use sherry for a lamb.) 

 

lamb-4

 

With a wooden spoon, scrape the bottom of the pan while the cooking wine heats up.  Be sure to scrape off all of the yummy bits of meat that was left while it was being seared.  Remove the netting from the lamb and then add one cup of water and replace the lamb in the pressure cooker. 

 

lamb-5

 

Place the lid on and bring to full pressure.  Cook based on 20 minutes per pound.  When it’s finished you will indeed have a juicy lamb.  I love eating mine with mint jelly and some cooked rice.  Yummy!

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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homemade-bread

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Alright.  You keep being told to store wheat right?  But I bet that you’re wondering what the heck to do with it.  I do address different ways you can use wheat in a previous article, and one of those ways is obviously bread.  Let’s face it.  Bread making in our homes is a lost art.  I forced myself to learn for three reasons.  

 

1) I knew that if there was an emergency which required me to live off of my food storage, I darn well better learn how to make bread out of all of this wheat I was storing.

2) I needed to find some way to introduce hearty wheat into my diet so that I didn’t put my digestive system into shock when I did start living off of it.

3) Even though I could get away with paying only 99 cents for a loaf of bread occasionally, I knew that if I could make it fresh, it would be sooo much better for me and therefore worth it. 

 

 

As it turns out, my decision to learn how to make bread was a good choice for other reasons as well. 

 

 

1) My husband LOVES it, as do the neighbors, my employees, and even me! (Plus, it makes for great gifts)

2) I now have the confidence I need to make it and know that we’ll be just fine surviving on it.

3) I now have a more accurate understanding of what OTHER items I need to have on hand in my food storage.  (Go figure. You can’t just make wheat bread with just wheat.)

4) My quest for learning how to make it has led me to develop a KICK BUTT-No-Fail recipe!  (I never thought I’d be saying that when it came to bread making!) breadsticks

 

So, I’m going to share the recipe with you today.  For those of you who are already pros, I dare say that you’ll find some twists that I incorporate that may be helpful to you.  And at the very least, you will LOVE the breadsticks idea.  For the record, this bread turns out nice and soft even though it’s 100% whole wheat. It’s often been mistaken as “store bought” bread.  (When feeding kids that can be a good thing.)bosch-mixer-whole

 

 

First, let me just share with you—don’t be discouraged by the methods that I use for making my bread just because you may not have them on hand.  I have had ALL of my new-fangled luxuries break down at some point and thus have had to make due with good old fashioned elbow grease.  I use a Bosch Universal Mixer and a Nutrimill to make this easy bread making.  The Bosch does all of my kneading for me, however, I have used my Kitchen Aid mixer instead of my Bosch, but it seemed to be awfully hard on the motor.  You’ve got to have one of the heavy-duty Kitchen Aid mixers if you’re going to make bread in it.  Otherwise you’ll have to knead the bread the good old fashioned way—by hand.  Also, keep in mind that I’m giving you my recipe based on the use of electricity and such.  Obviously, that won’t do you much good if your power is out and you’re camping for a while.  Don’t worry.  If you begin making bread more regularly “in comfort”, then when it comes time to do it under “less than desirable circumstances” you’ll be able to easily adapt, much better than had you never mastered it.  

 

 

Kellene’s Kick-Butt Wheat Bread (and her famous breadsticks)

 

 Ingredients:

 

6 cups of warm water (How do you know it’s warm enough or not too hot?  If it’s warm enough to bathe a baby in without scolding it, then it’s just fine.)

2 T. “Real Salt”

3 T. of Lecithin Granules

2/3 C of Vegetable oil (you can use apple sauce as a substitute)

2/3 C Honey

2 ½ T. of Dough Enhancer (I use the Magic Mill brand which you can usually find in the grocery stores, but definitely locate in your specialty kitchen stores. You can also use lemon juice as a dough enhancer)

12 to 16 C of wheat flour (I grind my own flour for this recipe each time with my Nutrimill—Yes, you can use white flour if you’d like, but you only need to knead the bread about ½ as long)

2 ½ T of Instant Yeast (I use SAF brand and I store the open package in the freezer or the fridge for years)

2 T. Vital Wheat Gluten (Note: ONLY use wheat gluten if your flour is old or a lesser quality wheat.  If you’re using fresh ground wheat or a good quality flour, then you won’t need the wheat gluten.)

 

bosch-mixer02Place 9 cups of freshly ground flour in the mixing bowl with the dough hook attached. Then add 6 cups of warm water.  Mix on speed level 1 until you’ve got a paste consistency.  Turn off the machine and add the yeast, salt, honey, oil, and lecithin granules (and wheat gluten if you’re going to use it).  Turn machine back on to speed 1.  Begin adding additional cups of flour one cup at a time.  As the machine bears down, increase the speed to 2.  Continue adding additional flour until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl.  I usually use a total of 15 ½ cups of flour.

 

 

 

Note: Here’s the trick.  You want to make sure that you do not add too much flour.  I like to add just enough so that the dough starts pulling away and that I can handle the dough.  This approach, as well as the lecithin granules and dough enhancer, is the reason why my bread turns out so soft.  Most folks who make homemade wheat bread add too much flour.

 

Set your timer and let the Bosch knead the dough for 7 to 8 minutes.  Stop the mixer.  Add the dough enhancer.  Then let the Bosch knead the dough for another 2 minutes (still on Speed 2).  Grease your hands and then gently remove all of the dough from the bowl and place it on a greased cutting board in an even rectangular shape.  Using a knife, score your dough into 5 evenly spaced sections.  Then pinch off each section, form it into an oblong loaf.

 

Note: Pinch your bread dough, not tear it.  Only score your bread so that you can see the 5 sections.  Don’t use the knife to actually cut the sections.

 

Place the loaf in 4 to 5 greased bread pans or you can use non-stick bread pans, depending on the size of loaves you desire.  (I use 5 non-stick bread pans, but I still spray them with “Pam.” They should be about ½ to 2/3 full.)  Place the loaves where they will not be blown on by the air conditioning so that they can rise at room temperature.  Cover the pans with Saran Wrap to keep them moist as they rise.  (I spray the Saran Wrap with “Pam” on the sides that will be on top of the bread to prevent the dough from sticking to the wrap.)  Let the dough rise until doubled.  This should be approximately 1 ½ inches above the top of the pan. When finished rising, place them in a pre-heated 350 degree oven. Bake for 30-40 minutes. 

 

When the bread is finished baking, you will be able to tap it lightly on top and have it sound “hollow.”  Take the pans out and place them on a cooling rack for about 10 minutes.  Then remove the loaves from the pans and cool on their sides sufficiently prior to storing.  

 

solar-oven-bread-bakedSpecial Note: This recipe makes great rolls as well!  As a special little trick when I’m hosting a party, I take the dough and roll them into small breadsticks (about 4 -5 inches long).  Then I dip the “breadstick dough” into melted butter.  Then I place them on a big cookie sheet about an inch apart from each other.  I then sprinkle McCormick’s Salad Supreme seasoning generously on top of them and bake them at 350 degrees for 13 to 18 minutes.  You will LOVE the taste of these bread sticks!

Preparedness Pro Note: If you would like Kellene Bishop to present an Emergency Preparedness message for your community or church group, please contact us at 801-788-4133.  Ms. Bishop is an experienced speaker and demonstrator on Emergency Preparedness topics and also has created a great “Preparedness Party” platform which makes the learning of such a topic more enjoyable for all.

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

 

powdered-milkOk, I admit it. I used to hate powdered milk as a kid.  But I have to admit, it’s come a long ways in 30 years, thank goodness.  With the cost of milk nowadays, if you’ve got more than 2 mouths to feed, it can cost as much for milk as it does to fill up your car with gas.  And if you’re a “dairy freak” like I am, you’ll wonder what in the world you’ll do in the event of an emergency when you may be FORCED to use powdered milk regularly.


powdered-milk-21Other than the fact that I always type the word “powdered” incorrectly, I truly do value this storage staple.  It will indulge my every dairy craving in a pinch, including buttermilk, cream cheese, sour cream, yogurt, and cottage cheese.  Just a little bit of culturing and it turns into whatever dairy product I desire.  In fact, I can even combine it with an equal amount of ice water and some flavoring and turn it into a yummy fluffy dessert topping.  And it’s great in all of my recipes.  It costs half as much as “fresh” milk, has zero cholesterol, zero fat, and is high in calcium, vitamin D and protein.  And hey, it even comes in an easy to store box which I can neatly stack on my shelves.  I have found no problem using it as a milk substitute in every recipe with just a bit of water added to it.  I can also make dry baked mixes or beverage mixes ahead of time with it with no need for anything else but water.  Ironically, the only thing I don’t care for powdered milk is as a substitute for just plain milk.  However, I have discovered the trick of adding in a ½ teaspoon of vanilla per half gallon of powdered milk mixture to make it taste a lot better.  I find that powdered milk tastes just fine when mixed equally with whole milk as well.  Plus, I’ve never had kids complain when I mix chocolate syrup or strawberry syrup in it straight.

 

Powdered milk tastes best if it is mixed up and allowed to chill overnight before serving, or for at least 4 hours.  Chilling actually aids in dissolving the powdered milk completely and gives it a fresher flavor.

 

OK.  To use powdered milk for just about anything, you first need to learn to reconstitute it.  So let’s start with that.

 

Reconstituted Powdered Milk:

refrigerate-milkTake a 2 quart pitcher and fill it just over half with very cold tap water.  Then add 2 and 2/3 cup of powdered milk.  Using a long whisk, whisk the milk until it appears to be well mixed and the milk appears to be mostly dissolved.  Then fill the pitcher to full with additional cold water.  It’s best to have a lid on the pitcher and then place it in the refrigerator overnight or at least 4 hours.  

 

To make buttermilk from reconstituted milk, you’re going to need some “starter.”  But don’t worry.  You can buy the small pints of buttermilk and store them in your freezer until you’re ready to use them. 

Cultured Buttermilk: You won’t believe how easy this is!  Take 3 and ¾ cups of reconstituted milk and add it to ½ cup of commercial buttermilk.  Allow it to sit on the counter overnight (8 to 10 hours at room temperature) and Voila! You’ve got buttermilk!  (I store it refrigerated thereafter, just so you know.)  I have to have buttermilk to make my all time favorite syrup recipe (Sorry, I’m going to save that for another post).

chocolatemilkHere’s another idea that I have loved to use with powdered milk.  It’s called “molasses milk.”  All you do is warm up about ¾ cup of reconstituted milk and then stir in a regular spoonful of molasses (double and triple accordingly).  It’s yummy.  It kind of tastes like caramel toffee.  And here you thought that molasses was just for cookies.  

Hopefully from reading this you’ve thought about the importance of having powdered milk in your supplies, along with molasses, chocolate syrup, and vanilla extract in your storage items.  For future reference I would also add that you’ll want lemon juice and cocoa as well.   

 

I look forward to sharing more with you later.

Copyright 2009 Kellene Bishop. All rights reserved.

You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Kellene Bishop.  

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cheese-variety2

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Well, at least those of us who are addicted to cheese anyway. 

  • Can you name at least 10 different kinds of cheese that you love?
  • Do you believe that cheese should be its own food group?
  • Are you helpless to abide by your diet unless it involves huge amounts of melted cheese?

Then this article is for you!

 

cheese-fruit-plateSo picture this.  It’s a bona fide emergency survival situation.  You are holed up on your home and living off of the emergency preparedness supplies you stored.  And you’ve got one heck of a hankering for some yummy melted cheese.  But you’re just not in the mood for the Velveeta, that nasty powdered stuff, or the “squirt” kind of cheese.  You want a good solid bite of a yummy Parmesan, or Swiss, or a sharp cheddar.  (I’m making myself drool even as I write this.)  But hey, cheese doesn’t store for a very long time, right?  Well, in this case, I’m happy to tell you that you’re wrong.  And if you’re a true cheese addict, then you’ll be happy to hear that you’re wrong for once, right?

 

cheese-wax-goudaSo here’s the good news.  You CAN have your favorite cheese on hand, even in an emergency, and even though no stores are open and you have no access to electricity.  All you have to do is buy the hard blocks of cheese that you want now in order to have them  stored for up to the next 25 years.  Cheese wax prevents your cheese from developing mold or bacteria and it keeps the moisture in.  Simply use a combination of dipping and brushing with a natural boar’s hair brush to apply the melted cheese wax liberally to your block of cheese, let it harden, and then, VOILA – you’ve got your wish.  Cheese treated with cheese wax will store for up to 25 years at a mild to cool temperature.  Sure, it will continue to age.  But it sure won’t get moldy!  (And even if it does in parts, you can simply cut off that part, and re-wax over it.) Be sure that you select block sizes of cheese that you and your family can easily consume within a 3 to 5 day period in order to avoid it going bad once you’ve cut into it.

 

 

A couple of tips you should know though.

  1. cheeseclothDon’t use paraffin wax.  It tends to crack.  Cheese wax warms slower and heats to a higher temperature and thus plies better to your cheese shapes and sizes.  Cheese wax is also less crumbly and you can use less of it than paraffin. Remember, it’s reusable too!
  2. I have yet to find a hard cheese that I can’t wax.  So long as it’s hard enough to be in a solid block, you can wax it.
  3. You don’t need cheesecloth, but if you desire to use it prior to your wax layers, it may be helpful getting the wax off.  I haven’t had any problems without it though.
  4. It’s best to melt the cheese wax in a double boiler as opposed to direct heat. Any pan you use to melt your cheesewax in will be your designated cheese wax pan. They are impossible to get clean afterwards. So be forewarned.
  5. cheese-wax-double-broilers1The less you handle the cheese with your hands the better. Use food handling gloves.
  6. Dip the cheese in for about 5 seconds, then bring it out and HOLD it there for about 90 seconds. Do 3 layers of dipping and then one layer of brushing.  (Using the natural boar’s hair brush)  The reason why you want to use this kind of brush specifically is because other brushes will apply the cheese wax too thick, or with crevices, etc.  This kind of brush is perfect for cheese waxing.
  7. You don’t need to use food-grade labels for your cheese, however, it’s smart to use a label on the outside of your cheese just prior to the last wax layer.  That way you don’t have to worry about it falling off.  Be sure to label not only the kind of cheese it is, but when it was waxed as well.
  8. cheese-wax-brushDon’t store your waxed cheese in additional containers.  Just stack them on top of like cheeses and let them breathe.  I like to hang them from the ceiling in a “fishing net” kind of contraption.
  9. Be sure to check for pockets or crevices that didn’t get sealed.  Four total thin layers of wax is a good practice.  There’s no need to do more coats than that.
  10. The cheese surface should be clean and dry prior to waxing.
  11. If your 2nd and 3rd coats are applied while the prior coat is still just a bit warm you will get a better adhesion.
  12. Cheese wax can be re-used several times.  You can simply wash it in warm water, let it dry and then re-melt it.  So when you remove cheese wax from your cheeses, you can simply reheat and reapply the wax.  Simply heat the cheese wax to about 200 degrees F.  This will also ensure that you’re not transferring any bacteria or unnecessary moisture to your new cheese–even when you’re putting it on your cheese which is cooler.
  13. You do not need to filter the cheese wax after you melt it.  So don’t worry about that step.
  14. Your first coat will have some unevenness to it.  Don’t worry.  The 2nd and 3rd coat will even it out just fine.
  15. Cheese will respond to gravity. So using cheesewax vs. paraffin is important as it’s more pliable. I periodically turn my cheese in view of the gravitational pull.

cheese-wax-waxCheese wax can be found multiple places online or in your local health food stores.  I also recommend that you use red or black cheesewax as it will prevent more light from getting int. You should also have no problem finding a boar bristle brush either.  

 

Once you get the hang of this cheese waxing stuff you can progress to making your own cheese from powdered milk in any flavor you decide!  Yummy!

 

Enjoy the recipe below!

 

Kristen’s Cheesy Roughin’ It Enchiladas

 

1 can of tomato soup

1 can of cream of chicken soup

1 regular sized can of enchilada sauce

2 cups of canned chicken, drained

About 2 cups of your favorite shredded cheese

 

cheese-enchiladas2Make your sauce by combining the soups and the enchilada sauce.

 

Use enough flour or corn tortillas to line a large baking dish or Dutch oven with your enchiladas (About 12 to 15 depending on how big you stuff them).  Be sure to spray your dish with some cooking spray.

 

Lightly coat the bottom of your tortilla with the sauce.  Then add about 2 tablespoons of chicken, according to your desire.  Top the chicken with about 2 tablespoons of cheese.  Then roll up your tortilla and place seam side down in the dish.  Continue until you’ve filled the dish a single layer deep.  Once you’re finished, pour the remaining sauce over the top and top with the remaining cheese.  Bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes until the cheese is completely melted.  You can add chopped black olives, black beans, rice, or even green chilies to this recipe as well. 

 

Preparedness Pro Note: If you would like Kellene Bishop to present an Emergency Preparedness message for your community or church group, please contact us at 801-788-4133.  Ms. Bishop is an experienced speaker and demonstrator on Emergency Preparedness topics and also has created a great “Preparedness Party” platform which makes the learning of such a topic more enjoyable for all.

 

Copyright 2009 Kellene Bishop. All rights reserved.
You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Kellene Bishop.  

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Friday before last I decided to throw a party at my home. I wanted it to be an enjoyable night for the girlfriends in my life, so I threw in some paraffin hand treatments and made tons of food from my food storage supplies.  We had 3 main dishes, 2 side dishes, an appetizer and 2 desserts.  Would you believe, the food disappeared rapidly with countless requests for recipes? 

 

After everyone had enjoyed their fill of yummy food – yes, I did say “yummy” and yes, it was all made from what I had on hand – we then all sat down and discussed the 9 key areas of emergency preparedness.  So many additional ideas and insights were added to my own and we all benefited substantially.  So in addition to sharing the recipes with all of my blog readers, I’m also going to break down various components that were discussed for practical application in your emergency preparedness activities.  So here’s a great tip followed by a recipe of ingredients from your food storage:

 

The Magic Number 12

 

cottage-mtg-2This is a great tip for novices and pros alike when it comes to accumulating your food storage. As I’ve shared previously, it’s important to “store what you eat and know how to prepare what you store.”  This particular tip addresses an effective way to store what you eat.

 

The other day I was reading a cookbook — I do that frequently — and I happened upon a recipe that I realized I could adapt to make from cans, jars, and food storage items.  So I purchased the items from the grocery, tested the recipe out on my hubby, and discovered we had a new yummy recipe that he would eat for a nice dinner, let alone in an emergency situation (He assures me that he won’t be as picky of an eater in an emergency as he is now…but I’m not planning on counting on that promise).  So I watched the coupons and ads for the local grocery stores and then went out and purchased enough ingredients to make that dish 12 times.  Why?

 

The objective is to store a year’s supply of food storage, right?  I’m also sensitive to avoiding “appetite fatigue” and ensuring that my husband actually enjoys the meals I create.  In an emergency, it’s not likely that you will be cooking 3 meals a day, rather one meal of substance, and the rest would be meals of convenience such as instant oats, cold cereal, peanut butter and jelly, canned chicken on crackers, etc.  As long as you have a plan for one main meal every day, then you’ll be far ahead.  To recap, if you have 30 different meals in your repertoire each month, then you are likely to not meet any appetite fatigue issues or stress because you’re attempting to introduce something new to your family when they are already under a great deal of stress as the result of an emergency. 

 

This is why I purchase my grocery items in increments of twelve.  If 12 is too much to handle due to space or financial restraints, then take it down to 6 or 4 or 3. But if you get yourself in the habit of buying this way when you have a recipe that works for you and your family, you will have your year’s supply of meals in a short period of time.  Now that’s what I call “eating the elephant one bite at a time.”

 

Here’s one of the recipe’s which I created for this event.  It’s just an open, dump, stir, and warm kind of recipe. Thus not only does it use a minimal amount of your physical energy, it will require a minimal amount of precious fuel as well to warm up.

 

Southern Chicken and Wild Rice Casserole

 

  • 4 cups of canned chicken, drained
  • 1 package (6 ounces) of Uncle Ben’s Long Grain and Wild Rice Original Recipe
  • 1 can of cream of celery soup
  • 2/3 cup of Miracle Whip (don’t substitute any different mayonnaise)
  • 1 can (8 oz) of diced water chestnuts, drained (I like to chop mine a bit smaller than they come in the “diced” can)
  • 1 2 oz. jar of sliced pimento peppers. (diced is fine also)
  • 1 regular sized can of French cut green beans, drained
  • 1 ½ cups of chicken broth OR water
  • 2 Tablespoons of pre-grated Parmesan cheese (the stuff in the green can is just fine.)

 

chicken-rice-recipeCombine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl and mix well with a spoon.  Transfer to a Dutch oven, or a pre-greased baking dish if you’re cooking in a solar oven. Top the dish with the Parmesan Cheese. If using a solar oven, be sure to cover the dish with foil.  If using the Dutch Oven, simply put on the lid.

 

Bake at 400 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes until it’s bubbling and the rice has cooked.  Let cool about 5 minutes and then serve.

 

You can also cook this most expeditiously and economically in a pressure cooker. Simply bring the cooker to full pressure with the ingredients mixed together inside, then once it’s come to full pressure, remove from heat, wrap in towels and continue to cook for about 15 minutes.

 

Enjoy!  Let me know what you think!

 

 

Copyright 2009 Kellene Bishop. All rights reserved.
You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Kellene Bishop.  

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Here’s a reality question. Do you really have sufficient food and water storage for one year? Recently information was revealed that the majority of a large nationwide mix of individuals who thought they had a year’s supply of food for their family, actually only had 90 days!  And of the individuals who thought they had a years supply of water only had 3 weeks!  Wow. Talk about a false sense of security, eh?  (Let’s at least hope that the situation has been remedied since the results of the analysis.)

 

In my opinion, what’s more disturbing though is the vast majority of individuals who know…really know…that they need to store a years supply of food, water, and other necessary emergency supplies but who have not even begun.  It reminds me of the joke of the guy who’s stranded on the top of his roof due to flood waters. 

 

The man prays and prays for the Lord to spare him.  Interrupting his prayers was a man in a small life raft, offering the man safe passage.  The praying man waved the life raft on, assuring the would-be rescuer that he would be just fine.  The man continues to pray for help.  Shortly thereafter a helicopter arrives to take the man from his roof.  The man waves the helicopter on convinced that the Lord would spare him in answer to his prayers. Finally, the flood waters rise enough to drown the man. As he’s standing before the Lord he asks Him why He didn’t answer his prayers?  Naturally the Lord responds that He did indeed send the life raft and the helicopter. 

 

Are we ignoring the life rafts and helicopters?  Have we as a nation not had sufficient warning that we need to be more prepared for the disasters in our life?  Do we need to be subjected first hand to a tsunami, the Teton Dam breaking, an earthquake, a debilitating ice storm, or a ferocious hurricane before we wake up and truly prepare?  Is there really any fact-based doubt in anyone’s mind that we need to take responsibility for our own well-being in the midst of a calamity?

 

Recently my local electric company and gas company officials were questioned as to their availability for a restitution of power and gas should there be a major disaster.  The gas company informed us that they had 30 employees to take care of over 450,000 homes. The power company informed us that they had only 4 backhoes to take care of that many homes as well. In other words, there is not going to be a quick fix in the event of a true catastrophe.  No matter how much we pay them, our demands for a restitution of service will go unheard.  It’s simply a matter of fact.

 

national-guardMy neighbor is a fireman.  A relatively close neighbor is a surgeon. And yet another is a National Guardsman.  But does this mean that these individuals will be on hand for their neighbors should there be a catastrophe? Nope.  Sorry. These individuals will be doing what they are trained to be doing…and doing it elsewhere.  Heck.  They are hardly ever home with things are going well, let alone when there’s a disaster.

 

4 in 100 families who religiously believe in a doomsday scenario are appropriately prepared with a years supply of necessary items.  Needless to say, those are some awful statistics—and this is among those who are religiously convinced individuals. What about the rest of society that simply doesn’t care or take time to think about such preparedness?  A lot of lives will be unnecessarily lost and a lot of hearts will be unnecessarily burdened if we do not take care of our needs for tomorrow, today.

 

May we all take a solemn responsibility for our well-being that we may be in a position to help others who are truly in need when times get really, really tough.

 

Preparedness Pro Note: If you would like Kellene Bishop to present an Emergency Preparedness message for your community or church group, please contact us at 801-788-4133.  Ms. Bishop is an experienced speaker and demonstrator on Emergency Preparedness topics and also has created a great “Preparedness Party” platform which makes the learning of such a topic more enjoyable for all.

 

Copyright 2009 Kellene Bishop. All rights reserved.
You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Kellene Bishop.  

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!