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By Kellene Bishop

Today I’m going to provide you with just a few “just in case” words of wisdom. These aren’t necessarily the most important or the most commonly forgotten “just in case” things I think about. But they would probably be the first ones I teach to any client. So here you go.

Photo c/o Jupiter Images

Photo c/o Jupiter Images

Always keep your gas tank as full as possible. Set the half full mark as your “refill mark.”  What if you need to bug out of town, or dash for an emergency of some other kind? The last thing you want to do is stop and get gas.

Always keep a first aid kid in your car—for you and others.

Always keep a full gallon of water in your car. It’s not just for you, but also for your car, care of others, etc 

Keep a “bug out box” in your car. Say you suddenly find yourself outrunning a tornado. Don’t let the location of where your home is guide your path and thus put you in danger. Get away from it ASAP and have the materials you need to survive for at least 3 days.

Yes, always keep spark plugs and a full spare tire in your car.

Be sure you know how to change a tire—just in case.

CPR Photo c/o Neatorama

CPR Photo c/o Neatorama

Learn CRP—just in case.

Keep your firearm ON your person—just in case. Statistically speaking it’s safer on your hip than in any part of your home. And it’s readily usable in a serious self-defense instance. Oh, and by the way, don’t go telling everyone that you’ve got a firearm and where it is. (See below.)

Have an alternative weapon in which you could use in close quarters such as an Asp, a knife, or a taser—just in case. I can’t even begin to tell you how many “attacks” actually are initiated between a known and “trusted” person and in close encounters. If they are known and trusted, you may be inclined to tell them where you carrying your firearm or alternative weapon. Don’t do it. If you do, then you’ve lost all of your potential to defend yourself. (“Trusted family only” is our rule.) I tend to live by the saying, “Ultimately everyone you love will hurt you. You just have to decide whether or not they are worth hurting for.”

Whenever possible, back into a parking space so that you can quickly pull out—just in case.

When you pull up to a light or a stop, never pull right up to the car in front of you. Always leave some “wiggle” room so that you can get out of there of your own accord—just in case. If you can see the bumper of the car in front of you, you’ve given yourself enough room. The same goes for when you’re stuck in traffic. Always be sure you have an “exit strategy.”

ice-in-case-of-emergency-just-in-casePut a “ICE” phone number in your cell phone address book. This is universal to law enforcement and other aware individuals that it’s who you want contacts in case of an emergency.

Have 1,000 rounds of ammo for each firearm caliber you own—just in case.

Be sure your family knows EXACTLY where to go in the event of an emergency—just in case. And also be sure that you have a Plan B and a Plan C.

Make sure that everyone in your family knows a code word for “entrance” and a code word or phrase for “we’re in trouble.” This is critical. Make sure that you practice it. Make sure that it’s not common, but that your family members practice delivering it in casual conversation—just in case.

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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By Kellene Bishop

Germ Warfare. Photo c/o positivepsychologynews.com

Germ Warfare. Photo c/o positivepsychologynews.com

Yes, you do have a right to be a fanatic. When it comes to war, any war, the winner is always the one who never assumes they are safe. These same tactics must be applied to germ warfare as well.

There just had to be a Part II to my previous article on Germ Warfare. After writing the first article, I kept being mentally nagged by other danger zones I had left out. In some instances, I believe these germ danger zones may be more nefarious than some of those listed in my original article. So read on, and prepare to change some more of your life’s habits.

Soda pop and other canned goods—The other night while I was teaching a class on quarantine/pandemic ironically, a free can of soda pop was offered to everyone in the room. As I watched everyone happily opened their can of pop and drank from it. I on the other hand washed mine at the sink, wiped it off with a sani-wipe and then drank from it—simply because I couldn’t find any straws. Remember, you have absolutely NO idea what rodents the cans were exposed to at their original warehouse, as they were transported, or as they were housed at the retailer you purchased them from. Hanta virus is still a viable concern even if you have no rodents in your own home.

According to a new study, steering wheels have twice as many germs as toilet seats. Photo c/o autoexpress.co.uk

According to a new study, steering wheels have twice as many germs as toilet seats. Photo c/o autoexpress.co.uk

Steering wheel—Even if I avoid the fact that many people have questionable hygiene habits when they are in their own little world in their car, the fact of the matter is, you don’t exactly turn your head away from your steering wheel when you sneeze, cough, etc. Your steering wheel gets the brunt of all that nature expels from your mouth and nose. PLEASE be sure to clean it off regularly with sani-wipes. (If you haven’t picked up on it yet, manufacturers of sani-wipes may be a hot stock pick right about now. :))

Get your drinks WITHOUT ice—I know that’s unfathomable to most of you. But here’s an eye opening statistic. You have a 70% chance of having MORE e-coli (which comes from feces) in your ice than is in the toilet from the same restaurant, airline, hotel, etc. Yes! Not just a 70% chance of finding e-coli there. But a 70% chance that your ice will be MORE contaminated than the toilet water! Studies showed that the number of stars a restaurant or hotel had made no difference in the quality of water in most cases. E-coli is introduced into the water by the water source used to make the ice, bare hands used to load the ice (instead of the scoop) and the fact that the lines to the ice machines are virtually NEVER cleaned out. 

Lemon wedges—avoid them in your drinks. I loathe the taste of tap water but I simply mask the taste by requesting a lemon wedge. Alas, I won’t be doing that any more. Lemon wedges have a 77% chance of being contaminated with e-coli, staph infection, or a myriad of other infectious bacteria. The only good thing you’ve got going for you is the fact that lemon juice is a natural anti-bacterial and disinfectant agent. *whew* Lemons are usually put into your drinks by bare hands despite the fact that they’re supposed to be handled with gloves. However, most restaurants leave it up to the servers to put them in your drinks. Having them placed on your dinner plates should be safe though as that’s usually done by a food handler in the kitchen.

Beware of gas pumps! Photo c/o blog.foreignpolicy.com

Beware of gas pumps! Photo c/o blog.foreignpolicy.com

Gas pumps—If I had to give an award for the LEAST amount of cleaning on a public item ever, gas pumps would win hands down. Think about it. When have you EVER seen someone clean those? When you pump your gas, use a paper towel that the station usually has on hand or at least sanitize the heck out of your hands before you touch ANYTHING else—including your keys.

Last but not least is a stern word of warning about playgrounds. Those bouncy houses that your kids play in NEVER get sanitized. They get vacuumed sometimes, but never fully cleaned. The ones containing the bouncy balls are a cesspool of germs of the grossest kinds. When have you ever seen a school janitor clean the chains on the swings or the bars on the monkey bars or the handles on the teeter totters? How about the playground equipment such as balls, jump ropes, etc? It’s imperative that you teach your kids to SANITIZE their hands after recess or after using such equipment on any occasion.

Bottom line, you have EVERY right to be fanatical about your health care. This is your life we’re talking about here. You MUST be in a heightened state of awareness in order to prevent you and your family from getting unnecessarily ill. One touch is all it takes folks, so be mindful. You wouldn’t take your kid down a dark alley in the middle of the city at 3:00 a.m. Making contact with e-coli or the Hanta virus or the H1N1 virus isn’t any less of a gamble. So start putting the odds in your favor. This is called germ warfare for a reason. Position yourself to win every battle.

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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We all carry our mobile phones with names & numbers stored in its memory but nobody, other than ourselves, knows which of these numbers belong to our closest family or friends.

If we were to be involved in an accident or were taken ill, the people attending us would have our mobile phone but wouldn’t know who to call. Yes, there are hundreds of numbers stored but which one is the contact person in case of an emergency? Hence this ‘ICE’ (In Case of Emergency) Campaign

The concept of ‘ICE’ is catching on quickly. It is a method of contact during emergency situations. As cell phones are carried by the majority of the population, all you need to do is store the number of a contact person or persons who should be contacted during emergency under the name ‘ICE’ ( In Case Of Emergency).

The idea was thought up by a paramedic who found that when he went to the scenes of accidents, there were always mobile phones with patients, but they didn’t know which number to call. He therefore thought that it would be a good idea if there was a nationally recognized name for this purpose. In an emergency situation, Emergency Service personnel and hospital Staff would be able to quickly contact the right person by simply dialing the number you have stored as ‘ICE.’

For more than one contact name simply enter ICE1, ICE2 and ICE3 etc. A great idea that will make a difference! Mobile phones today!

Please Spread this. It won’t take too many ‘words’ before everybody will know about this It really could save your life, or put a loved one’s mind at rest .

Let’s spread the concept of ICE by storing an ICE number in our

ICE will speak for you…

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