wheat


Genetically Modified Wheat photo c/o digitaljournal.com

Genetically Modified Wheat photo c/o digitaljournal.com

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By Kellene Bishop

As if we need any more “signs, indicators, or reasons”, here is  yet another reason why I believe we all should be getting a year’s supply of wheat for our family. If GMO wheat is widely accepted, then that means that it won’t just affect your buckets of wheat that you may buy in the future. It obviously means that ALL products which you purchase which will contain wheat, or wheat by products, will also contain unwanted chemicals necessary for the GMO process.  I’m simply not a fan of those kinds of limited choices. Thus having my own supply of wheat is a must for me and my household.   Just some “food for thought” folks.

http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_19379.cfm

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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By Kellene Bishop

Diatomaceous Earth photo c/o shadowridgedonkeys.com

Diatomaceous Earth photo c/o shadowridgedonkeys.com

So what’s in my buckets of wheat? Diatomaceous earth! Don’t worry. You don’t have to pronounce it. Just USE it.

What is diatomaceous earth? Well, it’s a HECK of a lot better than oxygen absorbers. It doesn’t suffocate wheat and it easily takes care of the weevil eggs that are inherent in all wheat. (The better the quality of wheat though, the less you have.) Oh, and it’s good for you too!

Let’s start with the wheat first though. Wheat is actually intended to be a living, breathing organism when you eat it. I’m sure you’ve heard or read of “the staff of life” before, right? It is actually living, just like a seed. So you actually WANT it to continue to breathe a bit. Just like anything else you want to sprout, you want this to essentially stay alive. So putting oxygen absorbers in it essentially sucks the life out of it. Eating “dead” wheat vs. ‘live” wheat is essentially the difference between eating freezer-burned produce and freshly picked. That’s not to say it’s a “no-no” to do so. It’s just not the best way to have your wheat. So how about using something in your wheat that not only is good for your wheat, but good for YOUR body too?

To put it in simple terms diatomaceous earth (DE) is actually the remains of fossilized algae. It’s found in deposits from seas and lakes all over the Western US and is usually about 1,000 years old when it is mined. This means that if you store it well, it has an unlimited shelf life! Yay!

Diatomaceous earth also helps with deworming. Photo c/o ehow.com

Diatomaceous earth also helps with deworming. Photo c/o ehow.com

Diatomaceous earth contains silica, sodium, magnesium, and iron exclusively. Not that I’ll be making a DE casserole anytime soon, but it is perfectly ingestible. (Be sure you ONLY USE FOOD GRADE DE—not pool grade!) It is heat resistant (BIG PLUS), absorbs liquid, (another plus) and is a natural insecticide. It can also be used as a mild abrasive, blood clotter, and as a water filtration aid. It’s also is a solid combatant against  mealworm, flea, tick, bed bug, ants, cockroaches, slugs, worms, and parasite infestations as well! (Just about every insect critter you can think of, actually.) Ideally you want your DE in a pure white color. The more gray it is, the more clay it contains. Understand that the food grade DE is not a chemical.  It works in a purely physical manner (of which I’m not sure I want to go into here so that I don’t gross anyone out).  Because of its ability to “deworm”, it’s commonly used to eliminate parasites and worms in livestock and pets. (I LOVE multi-purpose items, don’t you?) And it actually also has been known to enhance appetite in horses and cows. (Hmmm…maybe it will help 4 year-old picky eaters too?) Oh, and by the way, it also reduces the nasty smell of waste!

Now, let’s talk about human consumption for a moment. Food grade DE actually comes with a recommendation of 1 heaping tablespoon for humans DAILY in order to absorb endotoxins, e-coli, viruses, ethyl mercury, drug residues, as well as eliminate parasites, and regulates digestion. So there’s no need to worry about 1 tablespoon in your 5 gallon bucket of wheat. And yes, it’s perfectly safe for children and pregnant women. Diatomaceous earth has a negative charge and bacteria has a positive charge.  So it’s actually great at eliminating bacteria in your body’s system—without eliminating the good bacteria in your stomach. 

Just a spoonful of diatomaceous earth photo c/o earthworkshealth.com

Just a spoonful of diatomaceous earth photo c/o earthworkshealth.com

You only need about a tablespoon of DE for each 5 pound bucket of wheat in order to successfully inhibit infestation. It actually adds 15 trace minerals to your wheat prior to grinding. Should you use it? Well, a study done by ACRES, USA showed that after 12 months of storage untreated grain had 16,994 insects in it. Compare that to treated grain which had a whopping 15. I vote YES! (There’s a litany of other benefits for the body that simply won’t all fit in this article.)

Here are the downsides to diatomaceous earth. You don’t want to get it in your eyes. It will irritate them by drying them. It’s also drying to your skin if you are in long-term contact with it. (I HATE that feeling.) It will also kill beneficial insects such as lady bugs and bees. So be sure you want to use it where you place it.

Ok. I’m off to buy some more DE. What about you?

Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

By Kellene Bishop

Don't pour your gluten water down the drain! Photo c/o godsdirectcontact.org

Don't pour your gluten water down the drain! Photo c/o godsdirectcontact.org

As the last article in our wheat meat series, I wanted to share with you some ideas about how to use the milky water you get when making wheat meat. This watery substance, known as gluten water, has a great deal of vitamins and minerals in it. So any time you can use it in a dish, you’re dramatically improving the nutrition of that dish. This water will only keep for about 24- 48 hours. (I recommend refrigerating it if you’re not going to use it right away.) After that it begins to ferment, much like a yeast starter for bread.

After making my wheat meat, I like to pour the gluten water in a jar and let it settle for about 2 hours. What settles to the very bottom is bran. This bran is a great source of trace minerals and vitamins such as potassium and phosphorous. It’s great roughage for your digestive system as well. You can use this bran as a cereal or in your favorite batters. I even have used it successfully in my fruit smoothies. The bran portion will keep for about 4 to 6 days in the refrigerator. But you can freeze it. (Sorry, I don’t know of any other way to preserve it, so it won’t do you much good in an emergency unless you’re using it the same day that you make it.)

To make a bran cereal, simply add a pinch of salt, a pinch of honey powder, a pinch of nutmeg, a pinch of cinnamon, and enough water to thin the bran substance so that it is pourable onto an oiled cookie sheet. I bake mine in the solar oven for about 2 hours. But you can bake it at 300 degrees F for only 20-25 minutes. Yup. You’ll have HOMEMADE bran cereal! Also, here’s a GREAT recipe for bran muffins that you can make with the raw bran as well!

 

 

2 C. of raw bran
1 C. shortening
2 1/2 C. sugar
4 eggs
1 quart buttermilk
5 C. flour
5 t. baking soda
1 1/2 t. salt
3 C. crushed bran flakes

Bran Muffins photo c/o meals.com

Bran Muffins photo c/o meals.com

Big B Bran Muffins

 

 

Cream shortening and sugar. Add eggs and milk. Add bran. Add flour, baking soda, and salt. Mix in bran flakes. (Yes,  you can use a pre-made cereal for your flakes)
Bake in greased muffin pans.  375 degrees for 20 minutes.
Put in air tight container and store in fridge for up to one week.

Above the bran layer, you will see a distinct color difference of a milky substance. This layer settles between the water and the bran. This is your gluten starch aka gluten water. To extract this for use in sauces, casseroles, stews, etc, simply pour off the water slowly.  Then pour off the gluten water into a separate container. I like to use this instead of cornstarch to thicken sauces, gravies, and stews. I also like to put this in my smoothies as well since it’s so nutritious. To make a gravy, I just add 4-5 tablespoons of the gluten water to 2 cups of whatever liquid I’m using. 6-7 tablespoons will thicken a family-sized stew. You can also use this successfully when making ice cream from scratch. 

the-amazing-wheat-bookLeArta Moulton’s book, “The Amazing Wheat Book” is essentially my Bible when it comes to working with the bran and the gluten water. I love her pizza dough and cracker recipes!

Pizza Dough—by LeArta Moulton

2 cups starch/gluten water
2 cups flour (whole wheat, of course)
4 t. cream of tartar
1 t. soda
1 t. salt
5 T. oil
Mix all ingredients, adding oil last.

Spread dough with hands or rolling pin on pizza or baking sheet. Makes four 12-inch crusts. Bake at 350 degrees F for 10 minutes or until the dough is set but not browned. Garnish with your favorite toppings. Bake until heated through. (Be sure not to make the crust too thick, otherwise it will be tough.)

To make crackers, you can take the exact same recipe as above, but spread the dough thinly on a large cookie sheet, about ¼ inch thick or less. Instead of putting the salt in the dough, I like to sprinkle it on top. Bake at 400 degrees F for 10 minutes. Remove from oven and then score with the tines of a fork. Bake for an additional 10 minutes then turn over the cracker and bake and additional 5 minutes. I love topping these with parmesan cheese and garlic salt!

Wheat Meat Series

  • Part I: Discovering Wheat Meat
  • Part II: Preparing Wheat Meat
  • Part III: Great Wheat Meat Recipes
  • Part IV: Working with Gluten Water
  • Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

    Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

    This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

    By Kellene Bishop

    Doesn't that look delicious? utopiankitchen.wordpress.com

    Doesn't that look delicious? utopiankitchen.wordpress.com

    Ribs, meatballs, steak, corned beef and ground beef–made from wheat? You bet! And it’s tasty too!!! 

    As covered in the last 2 days of our articles, “wheat meat” is a GREAT alternative for traditional protein sources in your food storage. It’s also healthy for you and requires less energy for your body to process than “regular meat.”

    “Wheat meat” is also known as seitan (pronounced say-tan´), wheat gluten, and is sometimes also referred to as textured vegetable protein (TVP). Technically, wheat gluten is the part of the flour that you extract in order to make seitan/“wheat meat.”

    Some folks get confused between what they find already packaged in the store labeled as “vital wheat gluten,” “vital wheat gluten flour,” or simply “wheat gluten” vs. what I’m teaching you to make from scratch for yourself. The stuff you find in the store, usually in small bags or small containers, is actually a bit more convenient way of making “wheat meat.” The wheat gluten, which is what you end up with then you rinse your dough, has already been commercially extracted from the flour. (This is a process that I don’t believe you can duplicate in your own home in a dry format.) Purchasing wheat gluten is more convenient because it eliminates the steps of kneading and rinsing prior to seasoning. This way you can add your seasoning right in with the wheat gluten flour and water and then cook it.

    The reason why I’m not advocating purchasing it is because the wheat gluten flour is much more expensive than making it from scratch from your own wheat. Plus the extra steps really aren’t that much of a hassle or time consuming. The convenience of buying it at the grocery store comes a comparatively heavy price tag. It runs about $6-$8 for less than a pound. Considering that I just did a group buy for 50 pounds of wheat from a local farmer for $10, you can understand why I advocate just making it yourself. The good news though, is that the way I’m teaching you to make your own wheat meat produces the exact same result as the vital wheat gluten flour.

    Today I’m providing you with some of my favorite recipes for wheat meat. Even the most ardent meat eater will be hard-pressed to dislike these dishes. Let the drooling begin!

    Great Wheat Meat Recipe #1: BBQ Wheat Meat Ribs

    BBQ Wheat Meat Ribs photo c/o sharynmorrow

    BBQ Wheat Meat Ribs photo c/o sharynmorrow

    After rinsing completely rinsing your wheat gluten mass, allow it to rest about 20 minutes. While it’s resting, combine the following ingredients in a bowl.

    2 t. smoked paprika
    2 T. nutritional yeast (not to be confused with the yeast you use to make bread)
    2 t. onion powder
    1 t. garlic powder 
    Mix these dry ingredients together with a fork.  Then add:
    2 T. peanut butter or almond butter, or cashew butter. (For those who may have nut allergies, you may substitute tahini.)
    1 ½ t. liquid smoke (liquid or powdered will work fine)
    1 T. of soy sauce. (I prefer to use low sodium)

    With your hands, incorporate your rested gluten dough with this mixture until the ingredients looks evenly distributed. 

    Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. and coat an 8×8 baking dish with cooking spray.  

    Put the dough into the baking dish and flatten it so that it evenly fills the pan. With a sharp knife, score the dough evenly  into 16 rib shaped strips. (A sharp knife is key for this recipe)

    Place your mixture in the oven and bake it for about 25 minutes. (You can also cook this in your solar oven for about 1 hour.)  When it’s finished baking, re-score each strip. With a butter knife or spatula, gently loosen the ribs from the pan.  (You’ll want them to stay in two 8- piece sections when it’s time to grill them.) Once you’ve loosened them a bit, coat the exposed side of the baked dough with your favorite barbeque sauce.  (You can also substitute Chinese 5 Spice mixed with butter, Hoisin sauce, or sweet honey mustard.) The ribs turn out best if your sauce choice is nice and thick.

    Prepare your grill with cooking spray, and heat to medium-high heat. Then remove the two 8-piece sections of ribs from the pan and place them sauce side down on a hot grill. Coat the exposed side of ribs with more sauce.  Grill for about 3 minutes then turn over, and apply more sauce. You should grill them twice on each side, applying a generous amount of your favorite sauce.

    Remove the ribs from the grill and serve with your favorite side dishes.

    Great Wheat Meat Recipe #2: Mock Stir Fried Beef

    Wheat Meat Stir-fry photo c/o brbasdf

    Wheat Meat Stir-fry photo c/o brbasdf

    Cut your steamed gluten into thin strips, like you would want your beef for a fajita or stir fry. (About1 inch x ½ inch and 1/8-1/4 inch thick.) See a brief, 30 second demonstration here. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNo6kJB9SIY&feature=channel Then simmer it in 2 cups of the beef broth, 1 T. of soy sauce, and ½ t. of powdered ginger. Simmer in the broth until the liquid is mostly absorbed by the steamed gluten.  

    OR

    You can marinate the steamed strips in an oriental sauce with a little fresh garlic.

    THEN

    In 1 T. of sesame oil, sauté the following in a hot wok or heavy skillet until the vegetables are tender:

    3-4 T. of peach or plum jam
    3-4 T. vinegar (white preferred)
    2-3 T. soy sauce
    2 C. of sliced Oriental style wheat meat
    1 carrot—cut diagonally
    1 C. cauliflower
    1 C. broccoli (use the stems and florets—yum!)
    1 green pepper, sliced
    1 C. celery, chopped
    1 medium onion, sliced
    3-4 green onions, sliced, greens only
    1 fresh garlic clove, minced
    1 T. of fresh ginger, chopped

    Enjoy. (That’s more of a demand, rather than a request. :))

    Great Wheat Meat Recipe #3: Ha-cha-cha Wheat Meat Sausage

    After kneading, take 2-3 C. of wheat meat and incorporate the following mixture with your hands:

    1/2 C. nutritional yeast flakes
    1/4 C. chickpea flour
    2 T. poultry seasoning
    2 T. granulated onion
    2 T. ground or whole fennel seed
    2 t. fresh, coarsely ground pepper
    2 t. Spanish paprika
    1 t. dried chili flakes, optional
    1 t. ground smoked paprikat
    1/2 t. oregano
    1 t. sea salt
    1/8 t. ground allspice
    6 to 8 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
    2 T. olive oil
    2 T. soy sauce (low sodium)

    After mixing with your hands, shape the dough into 8 sausage shaped links/logs (use ½ cup of dough for each link). Roll each link in foil, twisting the ends of the foil to secure the links. Place sausages in steamer and steam for 30 minutes. Remove sausages from steamer and cool. Once cooled, remove the sausages from foil and refrigerate until ready to eat. (Note, you can use cheesecloth and simply tie the ends instead of foil if you prefer.) This is GREAT served in a marinara sauce over pasta!

    Wheat Meat Series

  • Part I: Discovering Wheat Meat
  • Part II: Preparing Wheat Meat
  • Part III: Great Wheat Meat Recipes
  • Part IV: Working with Gluten Water
  • Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

    Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

    This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

    By Kellene Bishop

    Italian "Wheat Meat" Dish by notonlypizza.com

    Italian "Wheat Meat" Dish by notonlypizza.com

    Wheat Gluten, commonly called “wheat meat” or Seitan, is a great staple to your food storage. As I addressed some of the whys and wherefores of “wheat meat” yesterday, today I’m going to share with you HOW to create your own wheat gluten. Just to get your imagination going here, you can make countless WONDERFUL dishes with “wheat meat” in place of your traditional fare. “Meatballs,” “ground chicken or beef,” “steak slices,” “ham,” “sausage”, etc., can all be deliciously created from your wheat storage. 

    12 cups of whole wheat flour will yield about four cups of raw gluten, varying slightly based on the quality of your wheat and its protein content. Hard red wheat or wheat from cold climates will produce the most amount of gluten. Four cups of raw gluten will then bake into about nine cups of ground gluten which is equivalent to about three lbs. of cooked hamburger, 150 “meatballs”, or 20 “steak slices.”

    For my meat loving readers, a good way to introduce “wheat meat” into your diet is to add it to your ground beef/chicken dishes at present. Start with half meat and half gluten. (This works well to indoctrinate not only into the meal, but also into the digestive system if you’re not already eating wheat.) Being married to a major meat eater, I’m confident that you’ll easily be able to go to a ¼ meat to ¾ gluten ratio in no time, with little or no resistance. And then of course move on to full fledged meals with the “wheat meat” as your only source. The nice part about “wheat meat” is that it doesn’t have a definitive taste or color. It readily takes on the appearance and flavors of what you cook with it.

    Keep in mind that I’m not writing about using commercial wheat gluten.  You prepare commercial wheat gluten differently than when you use your own whole wheat/flour. The last thing I want to do is put one more thing on your list to store, such as commercial gluten. Good news is that storing commercial gluten is not necessary if you’ve got a good supply of wheat. Your flour contains raw gluten. All you have to do is extract it from the flour. Fortunately, that takes very little effort on your part. 

    Photo c/o Herbi Ditl

    Photo c/o Herbi Ditl

    To begin preparing your “wheat meat”, simply mix 12 cups of whole wheat flour (you can use white flour as well, but you won’t get as much gluten) with 7 cups of water. You can do this in a mixer, or you can do it by hand. If you use a mixer, this process will only take you about 5 to 10 minutes. The consistency you want to end up with is flexible. It’s going to look a lot like your bread dough does before being completely kneaded. You don’t want dry, or watery. You want it to look a bit rubbery. You can adjust the amounts of flour or water after your initial mixing in order to get the consistency you need. When you’re finished mixing this together, set it aside and cover the surface with plastic wrap or a towel to ensure that it doesn’t dry out. Let it rest for about 20-30 minutes. If you have to ignore it longer than that, then I would refrigerate it.

    Now, place your dough in a colander/strainer over an empty bowl in the sink. I prefer a metal colander. For about 5 to 7 minutes, run lukewarm water over your dough. You want a slow flow on your water and you want to be sure that you have a bowl underneath your strainer to collect the water. (There are a whole lot of uses for this precious mineral/vitamin rich water. So don’t throw it out.) As the water is running you want to continue squeezing the dough and working with it in order to squeeze out all of the starch. You will know that you’re done squeezing the dough when the water coming through the strainer is no longer coming out a milky color. Rather it will be clear. As you’re working with the dough, you will begin to create a rubbery ball. Continue to work the gluten into a ball as the starch separates from the gluten. Your final ball won’t look very beautiful. It won’t look like a ball of bread dough because it doesn’t have any air in it. It will simply be a dense, rubbery ball of gluten mass. (Sound appetizing yet? Don’t worry. It gets better, I promise!) Here’s one thing I do want to share that I had to learn the hard way. Just before your dough is the right ball consistency when you’re rinsing it, it gets a bit stringy. It’s easy to think that you’ve messed up. But actually this is just the “storm before the rainbow.” Once the stringy-ness occurs, you’ll know you’re close to being finished with perfect gluten! Once you’ve got your ball of gluten, you’ve done the “hard work.”

    Cutting your wheat glutten into pieces. Photo c/o toptrailchef.com

    Cutting your wheat glutten into pieces. Photo c/o toptrailchef.com

    What you want to do at this point is to cook the gluten prior to adding it into your preferred dish. There are two ways to cook your gluten at this point—steaming it and simmering/boiling it. 

    The steam method is ideal for shaping your gluten into familiar shapes and textures. You simply form it into the shape that you want by hand, or wrap it in cheesecloth, and then place it in a vegetable oil-sprayed steamer. (Just like the instrument you would use to steam your vegetables in.) You can cook the entire ball of “meat” this way, or you can shape it into smaller portions. Place the steamer in a pot of boiling water and steam your gluten for about 30 minutes.

    You can boil wheat meat. Photo c/o toptrailchef.com

    Boiling "Wheat Meat". Photo c/o toptrailchef.com

    The boiling method is also easy and it adds extra flavor to your “meat.” In this instance I prefer to cut my gluten into smaller pieces so as to season them well.  Simply drop your strips or pieces of gluten into a pot of boiling, flavored broth. Simmer for about 30 minutes. It will just about double in size in this method. You can simply use a broth made with bouillon cubes, or you can create your own. Here’s my favorite broth to start out with.

    • 10 cups of water
    • About a cup of soy sauce or Braggs Amino Liquids
    • 2 bay leaves
    • A t. of garlic powder
    • A t. of onion powder

    Slice your gluten into small pieces, about the size of chicken nuggets. Place them in the hot water and continue to simmer for about 30 minutes.

    "Wheat Meat" Stir Fly photo c/o when-mia-cooks.blogspot.com

    "Wheat Meat" Stir Fly photo c/o when-mia-cooks.blogspot.com

    From this point you’ll discover the fun of creating “meat” out of “wheat”. You can now chop, grind, slice, steam, marinade, sauté, smoke, BBQ, or fry your “wheat meat”. The “trick” is all in how you prepare it visually and how you season it. It’s that simple—REALLY! (You can store your “wheat meat” in the fridge for the same amount of time that you would “regular” meat.) You’re now ready to cook the gluten as you would any of your other protein sources. I like to fry it in a bit of oil or butter until it’s golden brown on both sides, and then add a bit of BBQ sauce and let it simmer for a few minutes. It tastes like tender chicken or beef. I also like to grind up my steamed “meat” and use it instead of ground beef or chicken in my meatloaf, soup, burger, casserole, or chili recipes. I especially like how the “ground sausage” turns out.

    I also like to bread it with Panko bread crumbs, salt and pepper, and then serve a yummy, brown gravy over my “wheat meat”, just like chicken fried steak.

    I also enjoy sprinkling slices of Monterey Steak Seasoning on it and then grilling it. It’s even better after I let the “wheat meat” marinade in a steak marinade first. 

    Dang. I’m getting hungry. I’m going to sign off for now and go make some “wheat meat” for myself. I’ll share some detailed recipes for “wheat meat” with you on Monday, and I’ll also share some great ways to use the left over starch water with you next week as well! In the meantime, give this a try by making your own “wheat meat” this weekend. 

    Wheat Meat Series

  • Part I: Discovering Wheat Meat
  • Part II: Preparing Wheat Meat
  • Part III: Great Wheat Meat Recipes
  • Part IV: Working with Gluten Water
  • Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

    Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

    This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

    By Kellene Bishop

    Wheat meat photo c/o delectable-victuals.blogspot.com

    Wheat meat photo c/o delectable-victuals.blogspot.com

    To some hardcore carnivores, the idea of eating wheat gluten may sound like a form of vicious torture. But I can assure you from experience and experimentation that when it’s prepared properly you won’t be offended. (Unless you’re one of the unlucky few who are gluten intolerant.)

    Many years ago I willingly decided to cut down on meat in my diet. Not because of some of the most obvious reasons that other health fanatics do, but simply because I was trying to cut down on the fat in my diet. It got easier with time to the point that I ended up trying wheat gluten in a typically meaty Chinese dish. It was so yummy. If I could prepare wheat gluten this way in my home, I was sure to be hooked!

    Why am I talking about “wheat meat” on Preparedness Pro? There are actually several great reasons.

    “Wheat Meat” Benefit #1: Cost. As you may recall, I got pretty darn excited about buying my ground beef for only .78 cents a pound last month. However, if you consider that 9 cups of wheat gluten is equivalent to 3 pounds of hamburger, “wheat meat” may be a much more attractive protein purchase for food storage needs. Considering that I just paid just over $10 for a 50 pound bag of hard red wheat, I think you can see that “wheat meat” is a much better bang for your buck. It’s a lost less expensive than beef, pork, and chicken!

    “Wheat Meat” Benefit #2: Shelf-Life. As you already are aware, wheat has a very, very long shelf-life. Unfortunately your cans of chicken and beef, as well as your bacon bits, do not.

    “Wheat Meat” Benefit #3: Time. Remember what I say about conserving your own physical energy during an emergency? Preparation and energy times required for wheat gluten and regular meat are very comparable 

    “Wheat Meat” Benefit #4: Nutrition. As you know, purchasing organic poultry and beef is more expensive than “the regular stuff.” Yet the regular meat fare is indeed loaded with pesticides, fertilizers, hormones, antibiotics, steroids, dyes, and tranquilizers. (Yum. You’re salivating already for some KFC, aren’t you?) Today’s beef also contains 6 times more fat than it did in the 1950’s. The quality keeps going downhill unless you want to pay premium prices. Wheat gluten, however, has none of these toxins in them. “Wheat meat” is actually an excellent source of protein and 8 amino acids. (Be sure you supplement your “wheat meat” intake with foods containing Lysine in order to get complete protein nutrition.) It also contains vital vitamins and minerals. Traditional meat requires the use of vital calcium in your body. Whereas consuming fruits and vegetables (which is what wheat gluten is absorbed as) leads to calcium absorption for the strength of your body. It also has no cholesterol.

    “Wheat Meat” Benefit #5: Physical Energy. Your body requires more physical energy to digest regular meat than it does wheat gluten. The standard American diet requires the body to use 80 percent of its energy resources to digest food during several cycles of the day. However, “wheat meat” requires significantly less, thus giving your more energy for your other activities of the day.

    “Wheat Meat” Benefit #6: Taste. Not to be misconstrued with tofu, “wheat meat” successfully takes on a variety of tastes and textures based on simple seasonings. It’s VERY satisfying whether it’s in a ground, sliced, or shredded form. I have been amazed to discover that I’m eating “wheat meat” rather than a piece of tender steak in a fajita. It’s also great in sweet dishes like puddings and candies as well.

    So, until tomorrow when I share with you how you can easily make your own “wheat meat”, be mulling this concept over. Your body and your wallet may thank you.

    Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

    Subscribe to Preparedness Pro today and never miss a thing!

    This blog has moved. Please visit us at www.preparednesspro.com.

    By Kellene Bishop

    Dharma Food Supplies

    Food Storage photo c/o westword.com

    If you could only store four foods for you and your family, what would they be? Come on, take your best guess. The good news is you could indeed survive with some knowledge and creativity on just four foods for you and your family for an entire year, and you wouldn’t necessarily get bored either. The reason I share these four foods with you is in response to so many pleas to simplify food storage. Although I feel more strongly about storing what you eat and eating what you store using the “meal method”, some folks just simply won’t tackle their food storage needs unless it’s broken down to ultra simple. Well, here’s ultra simple, broken down to just four foods.

    Allow me to share with you what I call “The Vital Four.” I don’t call them that to be cute or cunning. These four foods are not only ideal and relatively simple to use, they are also still relatively affordable.

    Hard White Wheat photo c/o pgward.org

    Hard White Wheat photo c/o pgward.org

    So, what would The Vital Four be? In order of priority:

    • Wheat
    • Powdered Milk
    • Honey
    • Salt

    Now, before you get crazy, these foods would NOT be appropriate if you currently aren’t eating wheat. Remember that due to the significant lack of fiber in our diet today, if you were to go on an all wheat diet, you would be dead within 30 days due to the shock to your digestive system. So don’t plan on using these foods “cold turkey”, folks. You’ve got to get your body used to this kind of fiber ahead of time if you intend to survive on it. With four of the most simple foods, could this list be any more “ultra simple?”

    So why this particular order?

    Vital Four #1: Wheat. Wheat is at the top of the list due to its enormous amount of protein, multiple uses, fats, amino acids, carbohydrates, antioxidants, minerals and vitamins—not to mention its longevity in your storage. An unbroken wheat kernel has the ability to retain its fat without going rancid. For those of you who don’t know, wheat was discovered in the Egyptian pyramids dating back to 2500 BC. The story is told that 36 of the kernels were planted and grew and thrived into 1,500 bushels of wheat over six years. Even those who are gluten intolerant can still use wheat by sprouting it. Once you sprout it, it’s no longer a gluten compound. It’s a vegetable—particularly high in vitamin C and B which is great for blood sugar regulation and energy. (1 ounce of sprouted wheat contains an entire day’s supply of vitamin C.) In other words, sprouted wheat can compensate for the absence of fruits and vegetables in a diet. As you’ve heard me say, sprouting is ultra simple.

    Milk is Good for Bones. photo c/o franklinpierce.edu

    Milk is Good for Bones. photo c/o franklinpierce.edu

    Vital Four #2: Milk.  An important part of the “promised land” duo, milk has a great nutritional content–particularly protein and vitamin A and D, multiple convenient uses, and also stores very well–especially with today’s technological advances. Milk is a quality food which is found to be important for the proper function of the muscles and the bones, but even more so in times of stress. Very few foods can claim to assist the body in these two critical areas in one fail swoop, and none of the others I’ve found which do assist the body in this manner taste very good in baked goods, cheeses, and sauces like milk does. I mean really. Whoever heard of spinach cheese?  There’s nothing difficult about using milk. Measure it. Water it. Mix it. That’s it. Super simple!

    Vital Four #3: Honey. Honey is the ONLY food which stores indefinitely (except maybe Twinkies. But it remains to be seen whether we can really call the Twinkie “food”). It was also found in the Egyptian pyramids, and serves as a necessary sweetener in everything which may call for sugar. As you may have read in a previous article, it also has amazing medicinal virtues. One aspect you may not have considered is that the sweetness of honey is so fulfilling, it’s not likely to be over indulged in. The last thing you need in an emergency is to be addicted to a particular food. Unlike so many other sweeteners out there, honey is NOT addictive. In fact several university studies have shown that withdrawing from sugar is just as challenging to most humans as withdrawing from heroine. Honey also has small amounts of protein, iron, and vitamin C. Hmmm… sweet, nutritious, and an indefinite shelf-life. Sounds like a food storage dream.  

    Vital Four #4: Salt. Many folks are surprised to hear “salt” on my list of The Vital Four. Frankly, I’m surprised as well. I’m not one to “salt my foods. I rarely use it in my cooking, preferring other sources for a salty taste instead. In actuality, our bodies are just as reliant on salt as we are on water. In fact, it keeps our fluids in balance. It is necessary to all of the cellular processes in our body. ALL of them. It’s particularly necessary for muscle contractions, such as your heartbeat, nerve impulses, and the digestion of proteins. Our bodies do not produce salt. We deplete it through normal function. And we deplete a lot of salt when we’re involved in heavy labor or intense stress. Thus we must conscientiously feed it to our bodies. In addition to all of this, it’s also a great preservative for meats and vegetables without the need of any fancy equipment. Better yet, working salt into your diet doesn’t take any trickery.

    If you want to still keep things ultra simple but add a few more “luxury items” to the list, I would recommend vegetable/olive oil, peanut butter, legumes, yeast, molasses, and dried fruits.

    Passport to Survival photo c/o amazon.com

    Passport to Survival photo c/o amazon.com

    In summary, I find it interesting that The Vital Four are referred to in the Bible as foods of prominence: wheat—“the staff of life,” “land flowing with milk and honey” (mentioned 70 times in the Bible), and salt—“the salt of the earth” and “savor.” If you want a bundle of easy and creative recipes to use with your ultra simple food stores, I highly recommend Esther Dickey’s book, “Passport to Survival.” It was published in the late 60’s so you will most likely acquire a used copy on Amazon. But I find my copy to be just as useful—if not more so—today than perhaps it was intended to be several decades ago.

    So I’ve made food storage as simple as is absolutely possible. Got any more excuses for delaying your food storage?  🙂

    Copyright 2009 Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.  All rights reserved.  You are welcome to repost this information so long as it is credited to Preparedness Pro & Kellene Bishop.

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